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I basically want to ignore certain lines with characters in them, like if there's a line

// hello, i'm bill

I want to ignore that line while reading it because it contains the character "//". How can I do that? I tried method skip(), but it gives me errors.

public String[] OpenFile() throws IOException {

  FileReader reader = new FileReader(path);
  BufferedReader textReader = new BufferedReader(reader);

  int numberOfLines = readLines();
  String[] textData = new String[numberOfLines];
  int i;

  for (i=0; i<numberOfLines; i++) {
      textData[i] = textReader.readLine();
  }

  // close the line-by-line reader and return the data
  textReader.close();
  return textData;
}

int readLines() throws IOException {
  FileReader reader = new FileReader(path);
  BufferedReader textReader = new BufferedReader(reader);
  String line;
  int numberOfLines = 0;

  while ((line = textReader.readLine()) != null) { 
    // I tried this:
    if (line.contains("//")) {
      line.skip();  
    }
    numberOfLines++;       
  }    
  reader.close();  
  return numberOfLines;
}

Update: HERE's MY MAIN METHOD:

try{
 ReadFile files = new ReadFile(file.getPath());
 String[] anyLines = files.OpenFile();
 }
share|improve this question
    
How does that even compile? I cannot find a "skip" method in the String class. –  gnomed May 23 '11 at 0:42
    
Do you realize that the file is being read twice, in the code pasted after the edit? –  George W Bush May 23 '11 at 0:43
    
The readLines() method would be more accurately called countLines() or countNonCommentLines(). This entire exercise would be neater & faster by reading the lines into a structure that can expand as needed, such as an ArrayList, since it seems you only use the count to establish the size of a String[]. –  Andrew Thompson May 23 '11 at 0:44
    
It doesn't read the file twice, just counts the number of lines a file has and outputs them (in my main method). –  lrvilnius May 23 '11 at 0:48
1  
@Irvilnius: You are so reading it twice. First you count the number of lines (where the posted solutions will not count the // lines, as you wished), then you go back to your main function and output all lines (where the solutions that were posted were not applied). However, the lines were miscounted, so you only show the first N lines, where N is the number of non-// lines. This explains your "cutoff". –  Amadan May 23 '11 at 0:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
while ((line = textReader.readLine()) != null) {

    // I tried this:
    if (line.contains("//")) {
      continue;
    }

    numberOfLines++;

}

note that continue might seem a bit goto like and be prone to critique


edit here's what you are after (note this doesn't need the countLines method)

public String[] OpenFile() throws IOException {
   FileReader reader = new FileReader(path);
   BufferedReader textReader = new BufferedReader(reader);

   List<String> textData = new LinkedList<String>();//linked list to avoid realloc
   String line;
   while ((line = textReader.readLine()) != null) {
       if (!line.contains("//")) textData.add(line);
   }

   // close the line-by-line reader and return the data
   textReader.close();
   return textData.toArray(new String[textData.size()]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Whoever critiques goto in context such as this does not understand why goto was considered harmful. Dijkstra was against unrestricted goto. –  Amadan May 23 '11 at 0:36
    
your method doesn't work either. –  lrvilnius May 23 '11 at 0:36
    
+1 I love continue personally. not quite as bad as goto I dont think. I equate it more to break which is definitely not so prone to critique since it definitely the best way to end a loop in mid-set. –  gnomed May 23 '11 at 0:39
    
Continue is 100% perfectly valid, and to compare it to goto is doing it a disservice. Continue is pretty much the analogue of break –  Falmarri May 23 '11 at 0:42
1  
@ratchet freak: Thanks a bunch! It worked :) –  lrvilnius May 23 '11 at 1:22

As Andrew Thompson points out, it would be best to read the file line by line into an ArrayList. Pseudo-Code:

 For Each Line In File
   If LineIsValid()
     AddLineToArrayList()
 Next

UPDATE to fix your actual code:

public String[] OpenFile() throws IOException {

  FileReader reader = new FileReader(path);
  BufferedReader textReader = new BufferedReader(reader);

  int numberOfLines = readLines();
  String[] textData = new String[numberOfLines];
  int BufferIndex = 0;
  String line;

  while ((line = textReader.readLine()) != null) {
    if (line.trim().startsWith("//")) {
      // Don't inject current line into buffer
    }else{
       textData[BufferIndex] = textReader.readLine();
       BufferIndex = BufferIndex + 1;
    }      
  }

  // close the line-by-line reader and return the data
  textReader.close();
  return textData;
}

In your ReadLines() Function:

while ((line = textReader.readLine()) != null) {
    if (line.trim().startsWith("//")) {
      // do nothing
    }else{
      numberOfLines++;
    }      
}

Basically, you're on the right track.

Note: You may be interested in the startsWith() string function

share|improve this answer
    
it doesn't work - I want to skip lines that start with this symbol - // and have text in them. I tried your method and those lines are still being outputted. –  lrvilnius May 23 '11 at 0:37
    
Did you post your actual code above? Also, can you explain the purpose of your code? Is it to count lines, output lines, dump lines into a buffer? –  George W Bush May 23 '11 at 0:39
    
What do you mean, "outputted"? Your code sample did not contain any string output. If @hamlin11's or @ratchet's code is not working for you, you're adapting it wrong. –  Amadan May 23 '11 at 0:39
    
In my main method, I output the strings using System.out.println by creating an array. The one that I'm talking about now is a File Reading class that I created. –  lrvilnius May 23 '11 at 0:45
    
Your method actually cuts off the end... strange... –  lrvilnius May 23 '11 at 0:50

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