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Can I use this approach efficiently?

using(SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("GetSomething", new SqlConnection(Config.ConnectionString))
{
    cmd.Connection.Open();
    // set up parameters and CommandType to StoredProcedure etc. etc.
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
}

My concern is : Will the Dispose method of the SqlCommand (which is called when exiting the using block) close the underlying SqlConnection object or not?

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After disposing the SqlCommand com, its Connection instance will be unrooted (not used by anything). So Once the GarbageCollector finalizes the SqlConnection instance, Won't the connection be disposed? I think it will be, because connection is referenced by only cmd here. –  Mecek Oct 22 '13 at 21:41
    
Well in that case, @Mecek, the memory will be freed harder since it will go through finalization which will promote it from gen0 to gen1, I guess. –  Andrei Rînea Oct 23 '13 at 13:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 61 down vote accepted

No, Disposing of the Command will not effect the Connection. A better approach would be to also wrap the SqlCommand in a using block as well

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connstring))
{
    conn.Open();
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(cmdstring, conn))
    {
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}

Otherwise, the Connection is unchanged by the fact that a Command that was using it was disposed (maybe that is what you want?). But keep in mind, that a Connection should be disposed of as well, and likely more important to dispose of than a command.

EDIT:

I just tested this:

SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connstring);
conn.Open();

using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("select field from table where fieldid = 1", conn))
{
    Console.WriteLine(cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString());
}

using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("select field from table where fieldid = 2", conn))
{
    Console.WriteLine(cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString());
}

conn.Dispose();

The first command was disposed when the using block was exited. The connection was still open and good for the second command.

So, disposing of the command definitely does not dispose of the connection it was using.

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You don't need to open the connection before creating the command right? Make it a little cleaner like this: using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connstring)) using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(cmdstring, conn)) { conn.Open(); cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); conn.Close(); } –  John Bubriski May 13 '09 at 12:48
    
I guess the formatting doesn't stick... but basically lump the to using statements together and get rid of a level of nesting. (If you want) –  John Bubriski May 13 '09 at 12:48
6  
The point of the example is not to show a simpler syntax, but to demonstrate that both SqlCommands can be used with the same connection and then disposed without disposing of the connection. The connection needs to be opened and then used twice in order to demonstrate this (see original question). –  Ryan Farley May 16 '09 at 17:16

SqlCommand.Dispose will not be sufficient because many SqlCommand(s) can (re)use the same SqlConnection. Center your focus on the SqlConnection.

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I use this pattern. I have this private method somewhere in my app:

private void DisposeCommand(SqlCommand cmd)
{
    try
    {
        if (cmd != null)
        {
            if (cmd.Connection != null)
            {
                cmd.Connection.Close();
                cmd.Connection.Dispose();
            }
            cmd.Dispose();
        }
    }
    catch { } //don't blow up
}

Then I always create SQL commands and connections in a try block (but without being wrapped in a using block) and always have a finally block as:

    finally
    {
        DisposeCommand(cmd);
    }

The connection object being a property of the command object makes a using block awkward in this situation - but this pattern gets the job done without cluttering up your code.

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this assumes that you're only using your connection once for that single command, and therefore you will have to create a new connection and open it, everytime you need to execute a new command. There's a lot of overhead in creating and opening connections. –  Thiago Silva May 18 '11 at 16:49
5  
In my eyes this is ugly code, and would be much cleaner to just use the using-statement that automatically takes care of disposing the command. –  KristianB Sep 18 '12 at 7:34
    
Downvoting - unnecessary and less effective reimplemenation of the 'using' method. –  NickG May 9 '13 at 11:36
    
It’s not only unnecessary code, but also error-prone. 'using' is a better way to bracket use of a resource with its eventual disposal. –  andrewf May 20 at 16:20

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