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Hey everyone, I previously asked a question on how to create a 2-D grid for a board game in Python and have now encountered another problem with making this board game.

What i'm trying to do is move pieces (numbers or letters) on my board and apply that move to the board for when it's that same players turn next. Basically,

1 . . . .
2 . . . .
3 . . . .
4 . . . .
. a b c d
Letters' turn: an
1 . . . .
2 . . . .
3 . . . .
4 a . . .
. . b c d
Numbers' turn: 1e
. 1 . . .
2 . . . .
3 . . . .
4 a . . .
. . b c d
Letters' turn: an
. 1 . . .
2 . . . .
3 a . . .
4 . . . .
. . b c d

You get the idea...

I have the board but, I can't figure out how to move the pieces and keep them in place so they can continue their move on the next turn.

I have functions:

def doMove(currentPlayer, board):
def isValidMove(board, move):
and def applyMove(board, move):

Any advice you could lend would be great!

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Without seeing the full function definitions, the only advice I can give you is that your functions are reasonably well-named (with the exception of "doMove", which is a little vague). –  senderle May 23 '11 at 1:49
2  
You need to show us the data structure you have used for your board and the pieces. What have you tried so far? How is it not working? –  nakedfanatic May 23 '11 at 1:52
    
Also, please read the "how to format" sidebar next time you post a question -- anything that you want to look like code should be indented four spaces. –  senderle May 23 '11 at 1:55
    
It's all in the data structure: design a good one, and the methods will practically write themselves. –  FMc May 23 '11 at 2:08

1 Answer 1

I believe you are missing a key feature of classes in python: internal state. Here's a simple example:

class Counter():
  def __init__(self):
    self.internalCount = 0;
    return
  def addToInternalCount(self, val):
    self.internalCount = self.internalCount + val
    return self.internalCount

Note that if I create a new Counter, I can call addToInternalCount many times and the internalCount data persists across calls. Also note that there is nothing special about a class as far as state goes. Any variable external to the function could have been updated and the value would have persisted across calls.

Is there anything special about internalCount? Not really. That could just as easily represent the position on the x-axis. Please have a go at it.

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