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If I have the method public void send() {//some code} in a class and have a child of this class also have a method public void send() {//some code}, how do I ensure that the child must call super.send() somewhere in the send() method that it's trying to override?

I was wondering about this because I've written in APIs where if you don't call the super of that method when overriding it, it'll throw an exception telling me that I haven't called the super method. Is this hard coded or can this be done with some keywords in Java?

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7 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can't really, but you can...

class MySuperClass {
    public final void send() {
        preSend();
        // do the work...
        postSend();
    }

    protected void preSend() {
        // to be overridden in by sub classes
    }

    protected void postSend() {
        // to be overridden in by sub classes
    }

}
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This is probably better for most things. However, you can use flags to force the call-up at run time (but there's no compile time catch). –  Ted Hopp May 23 '11 at 4:12
    
I would make preSend() and postSend() as virtual. That's because they might not be called if object is instantiated as: MySuperClass * obj = new ClassDerivedFromMySuperClass(); This is very often used approach (for example for plugins) and will make ClassDerivedFromMySuperClass::preSend() and ClassDerivedFromMySuperClass::postSend() not to be called. –  Predrag Manojlovic Jun 25 at 15:59
    
The question & answer are about java –  Tom Jun 25 at 16:10
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You can do this by adding an abstract method (don't see another way) :

abstract class MyClass 
{

public final void send()  // forbid changing this.
{
 // do something
 doSend():
}

protected abstract doSend(); // no external calls

}
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You can't really force a subclass to call the base one. One thing you can do is to change your send method into a base (final) "send" and a "sendcore" (virtual) which would be overriden by the subclasses. The base "send" would set some flag stating that "sendcore" hasn't been called, and then call "sendcore". When it returns it can check whether the child "sendcore" has called the base class.

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Conceptually, this is like 'delegating to a child'. To achieve this, the parent class should implement final method which invoke an abstract method, which the child is supposed to implement.

abstract class Parent 

{

public final void invoke() { //pre invoke code doInvoke(): //post invoke code }

protected abstract doInvoke(); //child should implement this

}

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There is no keyword that enforces this. In my opinion, you either

  1. Provide the subclass with all the information (via protected methods or what not) it needs to completely override and change the send call itself, or...
  2. Document the API so that it is known that they must eventually call send themselves via super. I would imagine most people who are overriding a superclass method would do this if enough of the class is abstracted anyway.
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There's nothing built into Java to enforce calling a superclass method. One approach to this is to use private flags in the superclass together with a delegation method. Something like this:

public class Super {
    private boolean inSend;
    private boolean superCalled;
    public final void send() {
        inSend = true;
        superCalled = false;
        doSend();
        inSend = false;
        if (!superCalled) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Failed to call super.doSend()");
        }
    }
    protected void doSend() {
        if (!inSend) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Cannot call doSend() directly");
        }
        superCalled = true;
        // base class functionality
    }
}
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_super

What you're trying to do is an anti-pattern; you can do it (many Java core classes do), but you shouldn't - unless you have a really good reason for it.

Except for this bit, all answers provided here are correct.

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