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I'm trying to remove the lower case letters on a TextBox..

For example, short alpha code representing the insurance (e.g., 'BCBS' for 'Blue Cross Blue Shield'):

txtDesc.text = "Blue Cross Blue Shield";

string Code = //This must be BCBS.. 

Is it possible? Please help me. Thanks!

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11  
What if the user enters "BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD", or worse "blue cross blue shield"? –  Raghu Jun 9 '11 at 12:36

11 Answers 11

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Well you could use a regular expression to remove everything that wasn't capital A-Z:

using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

class Program
{
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        string input = "Blue Cross Blue Shield 12356";
        Regex regex = new Regex("[^A-Z]");
        string output = regex.Replace(input, "");
        Console.WriteLine(output);
    }
}

Note that this would also remove any non-ASCII characters. An alternative regex would be:

Regex regex = new Regex(@"[^\p{Lu}]");

... I believe that should cover upper-case letters of all cultures.

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2  
Maybe new Regex("...", RegexOptions.Compiled)? –  abatishchev May 23 '11 at 6:02
2  
@abatishev - the compilation takes extra time, you don't want that on a local regex that's used once. –  Hans Kesting May 23 '11 at 6:04
    
Actually it should be compiled and cached (or stored maybe in the static variable or sth) because creating new Regex every request MAY be a bit longer... but it is still such a micro optimization;) –  luckyluke Jun 9 '11 at 19:35
string Code = new String(txtDesc.text.Where(c => IsUpper(c)).ToArray());
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I agree with this one with the addition of removing the spaces with either c => IsUpper(c) || c == ' ' or c => IsUpper(c) || IsWhiteSpace(c). –  Almund May 23 '11 at 6:02
    
@Almund Why a whitespace check? –  user166390 May 23 '11 at 6:08
1  
As it is, that won't work. It'll compile, then fail with a cast exception at execution time. You'd need something like string code = new string(txtDesc.text.Where(c => IsUpper(c)).ToArray()); –  Jon Skeet May 23 '11 at 6:08
    
Why does this fail since there is an explicit from IEnumerable<char> to string? :( –  user166390 May 23 '11 at 6:11
    
@Almund - Why would you want the predicate to return true for whitespace. The idea is to only return characters from the sequence which are upper-case characaters. .Where(c => IsUpper(c)) will do just that. –  Andrew Cooper May 23 '11 at 6:11

Here is my variant:

var input = "Blue Cross Blue Shield 12356";
var sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (var ch in input) {
  if (char.IsUpper(ch)) { // only keep uppercase
    sb.Append(ch);
  }
}
sb.ToString(); // "BCBS"

I normally like to use regular expressions, but I don't know how to select "only uppercase" in them without [A-Z] which will break badly on characters outside the English alphabet (even other Latin characters! :-/)

Happy coding.


But see Mr. Skeet's answer for the regex way ;-)

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string Code = Regex.Replace(txtDesc.text, "[a-z]", "");
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This won't remove the spaces (or numbers). –  user166390 Jun 7 '11 at 17:39

I´d map the value to your abbreviation in a dictionary like:

Dictionary<string, string> valueMap = new Dictionary<string, string>();
valueMap.Add("Blue Cross Blue Shield", "BCBS");

string Code = "";
if(valueMap.ContainsKey(txtDesc.Text))
  Code = valueMap[txtDesc.Text];
else
  // Handle

But if you still want the functionality you mention use linq:

string newString = new string(txtDesc.Text.Where(c => char.IsUpper(c).ToArray());
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Your LINQ code doesn't compile and if even does - does the apposite thing. –  abatishchev May 23 '11 at 6:04
    
I'm having an error "No overload for method 'Join' takes '1' arguments" please help me.. tnx –  im useless May 23 '11 at 6:12
    
Sorry! I hadn't double checked the syntax, the String.Join isn't to friendly with chars. Should work with new string() as it is now, otherwise look at Andrew Coopers answer. –  Almund May 23 '11 at 6:28
    
Again look at Coopers answer, I had flipped the functionality to select all lowercase letters instead. –  Almund May 23 '11 at 6:33

You can try use the 'Replace lowercase characters with star' implementation, but change '*' to '' (blank)

So the code would look something like this:

txtDesc.Text = "Blue Cross Blue Shield";
string TargetString = txt.Desc.Text;
string MainString = TargetString;
for (int i = 0; i < TargetString.Length; i++)
{
    if (char.IsLower(TargetString[i]))
    {
        TargetString = TargetString.Replace( TargetString[ i ].ToString(), string.Empty );
    }
}
Console.WriteLine("The string {0} has converted to {1}", MainString, TargetString);
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2  
That needs to assign the result of the replace to something ;-) –  user166390 May 23 '11 at 6:01
    
Replace is not a member of TextBox :( –  user166390 May 23 '11 at 6:15
    
@pst: updated the codes. Am I doing it right now? –  abramlimpin May 23 '11 at 6:29
1  
Not quite. '' is an empty character literal, which is not allowed. string.Replace(string,string) would work (an empty string is quite allowed), but there is still a bug in the logic which yields an incorrect result. LINQPad is a neat tool to test out quick code. The bug has to do because some characters are skipped over -- the indexes are changed after the replace. –  user166390 May 23 '11 at 6:36
    
Changed it to string.Empty but I think I'm still wrong. –  abramlimpin May 23 '11 at 7:04
string caps = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

string.Join("",
   "Blue Cross Blue Shield".Select(c => caps.IndexOf(c) > -1 ? c.ToString() : "")
                           .ToArray());
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Without Regex:

string input = "Blue Cross Blue Shield";
string output = new string(input.Where(Char.IsUpper).ToArray());
Response.Write(output);
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It's the same answer as @Andrew Cooper string Code = new String(txtDesc.text.Where(c => IsUpper(c)).ToArray()); –  manji Jun 10 '11 at 9:08
    
I disagree, it is similar but NOT the same: (1) @andrew-cooper answer does not compile (as commented by @jon-skeet) it should be Char.IsUpper. (2) Char.IsUpper is not the same as c => Char.IsUpper(c) as it replaces an anonymous method with a method group - see link –  Barry Kaye Jun 10 '11 at 10:56

Rather than matching on all capitals, I think the specification would require matching the first character from all the words. This would allow for inconsitent input but still be reliable in the long run. For this reason, I suggest using the following code. It uses an aggregate on each Match from the Regex object and appends the value to a string object called output.

string input = "Blue Cross BLUE shield 12356";
Regex regex = new Regex("\\b\\w");
string output = regex.Matches(input).Cast<Match>().Aggregate("", (current, match) => current + match.Value);
Console.WriteLine(output.ToUpper()); // outputs BCBS1
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P.s.s The Regex used in here uses \b which means word boundary and \w which means word character. A word character can be upper case or lower case or from any culture :) –  soniiic Jun 9 '11 at 14:37
string Code = Regex.Replace(txtDesc.text, "[a-z]", "");
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1  
This won't remove the spaces (or numbers). –  user166390 Jun 7 '11 at 17:39

This isn't perfect but should work (and passes your BCBS test):

private static string AlphaCode(String Input)
{
    List<String> capLetter = new List<String>();
    foreach (Char c in Input)
    {
        if (char.IsLetter(c))
        {
            String letter = c.ToString();
            if (letter == letter.ToUpper()) { capLetter.Add(letter); }
        }
    }
    return String.Join(String.Empty, capLetter.ToArray());
}

And this version will handle strange input scenarios (this makes sure the first letter of each word is capitalized).

private static string AlphaCode(String Input)
{
    String capCase = System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(Input.ToString().ToLower());

    List<String> capLetter = new List<String>();
    foreach (Char c in capCase)
    {
        if (char.IsLetter(c))
        {
            String letter = c.ToString();
            if (letter == letter.ToUpper()) { capLetter.Add(letter); }
        }
    }
    return String.Join(String.Empty, capLetter.ToArray());
}
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