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Say I have a python module foo.py which contains:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

I next want to parse this script and inject a method in each of it's classes, re-writing it to something like this:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def my_method(self):
        pass # do some stuff here

I've noticed python 2.6 has an ast module which could be used for this, but unfortunately I need to do this in python 2.5. Any suggestions are welcomed.

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4  
Are you actually parsing .py Python source text files and wanting to write out .py files, or are you talking about modifying class definitions in runtime memory? – dkamins May 23 '11 at 6:28
1  
@dkamins parsing .py Python source text files and wanting to write out.py files – Ioan Alexandru Cucu May 23 '11 at 7:41

I understand what you are trying to do, but if your source code is reasonably simple, perhaps you could skip the whole parsing and writing back altogether and just run a regexp?

Something like:

re.sub('^class\s+(\w+):\s*\n', 'class \\1:\n%s' % method_source, file_source, flags=re.M)

Just get the indentation right..

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The example is there just to point out the thing that I am trying to accomplish. The actual source code which I am trying to edit is a much more complex script, thus I wouldn't rely on plain string parsing. For example, by looking at your regex, I could have the word 'class' as part of a multiline comment, in which case the regex would fail – Ioan Alexandru Cucu May 23 '11 at 18:48
    
There really are not that many ways for it to fail. Nested classes would not be patched. Do you have any? Should they be patched? All that would happen with a multiline comment surrounding a class is that that class would be edited too. If you want a real parser you could use pyparsing and this grammar definition: pyparsing.wikispaces.com/file/view/pythonGrammarParser.py – Gurgeh May 23 '11 at 20:26
    
The regex wouldn't work for new style classes. And even if you fix it, you might have the case where the inherited classes spread across multiple lines. You could fix this as well, but then, the resulting regex would risk becoming a monster. – Ioan Alexandru Cucu May 24 '11 at 18:48

Do you already have the script? You should be able to monkey patch it right now. To satisfy your current requirements, something like this would be fine:

class Foo(object):
    def my_method(self):
        pass

Alternatively, you could define my method and add it to the Foo class as an attribute:

def my_method(self):
    pass

Foo.my_method = my_method
#or
Foo.__dict__.my_method = my_method
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1  
I think that he want to add them dynamically at runtime, and without specifying every class name. Something like for spam in foo.classes: spam.my_method = my_method. – Evpok May 23 '11 at 6:38
1  
I've thought about the second approach. It wouldn't work as straight forward as your example, but it would work by using python's new module (docs.python.org/library/new.html). The problem with that is that the generated script would be rather hard to read, so I would prefer something like your first suggestion, but I don't know how to safely do that without relaying on building a syntax tree, adding nodes to it, and then rewriting it... – Ioan Alexandru Cucu May 23 '11 at 6:47
    
@Ioan you should add an answer to your question and allow others to vote for it. That sounds like a sensible approach. – Tim McNamara May 23 '11 at 9:58
    
@Ioan If you rewrite your entire syntax tree, you might lose comments (which are not included in a standard Python parser) and formatting. – Gurgeh May 23 '11 at 20:30
    
@Gurgeh Yeah, I don't actually care about loosing comments. My only concern is for the output script to function in the expected mode. – Ioan Alexandru Cucu May 24 '11 at 18:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A solution would be:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

import new

def some_func(self):
    print "foobar"

Foo.my_method = new.instancemethod(some_func, None, Foo)

The problem is, I don't like appending the new method definitions at the end of the file. I would like the classes in generated script to look like:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def my_method(self):
        print "foobar"

but can't find a solution to this without building, modifing and then writing back a sintax tree.

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