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I am trying to do something like this, But, I am getting an error, "Invalid Base class T". As far as our understanding goes, Base class will get instantiated with Type name T in compile time and I will be getting the defination of T in compile time. I tried replacing "Typename" with "Class",still I get the same error. Any ideas ?

template <typename T>  
class Base  
{ 
  private:  
  class A : public T{};

};


// It works when I do the following in main ...  

class A{}  
Base* B = new Base<A> B;  

// It throws error, when I pass in int,double,float,   
//makes sense,because these are basic data types ...  

Base* B = new Base<int> B;  


// Neil's Snippet with the error reproduced ...  

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;  

template <typename T>  
class Base  
{  
 public :
 Base::Base(int a)  
 {  
   A a;
 }
 private:  
 class A : public T{};
};  

Base <int> b;  

int main(){  
cout << &b << endl;  
}
share|improve this question
1  
Obviously, replacing typename with class is not going to help. After all, they're equivalent. –  Nawaz May 23 '11 at 6:50
4  
Who is voting this up? The question is unclear, and the code is not even vaguely syntactically correct. –  nbt May 23 '11 at 6:54
1  
That is not a reason to vote the question down. Maybe Atul's first language is not English. Also, maybe Atul's is not yet quite accustomed to the usage of SO's text editor options. Please be patient. ;) –  Alerty May 23 '11 at 7:06
    
What is the actual question? You seem to have figured out that you cannot inherit from an integral or floating point type (besides all the typos in the question the comments say that you have made it compile). You ask for ideas to do what exactly? You have not stated the problem that you want to solve, add that information and people will be able to come with some idea on how to tackle it. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 23 '11 at 8:14
    
We are trying to create a Heap Object which will be doing memory management. –  Atul May 23 '11 at 10:31

4 Answers 4

Typename is not a valid C++ keyword, typename is. Similary Class is different from class.

Note that C++ is case sensitive. Apart from that you are missing a semicolon in your code.

class A : public T{}; // missing semicolon here
share|improve this answer

The following code should compile:

template <typename T>  
//        ^ lower case
class Base  
{ 
  private:  
  class A : public T {}; // < lost ;

  A a; // do you use class A in this way ?
};

Note, that T should be complete type at the point of instantination. The following will fail:

class some; // incomplete type
Base<some> a;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 better answer. –  Nawaz May 23 '11 at 6:56

You got a few basic syntax errors in this which is causing you grief: Typename should be typename and you need a semi colon after the internal class definition, so this compiles perfectly:

template <typename T>  
class Base  
{ 
  private:  
  class A :  public T{};

};
share|improve this answer

This compiles:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <typename T>  
class Base  
{ 
  private:  
  class A : public T{};

};

Base <int> b;

int main(){
    cout << &b << endl;
}

Edited for the benefit of Nawaz.

share|improve this answer
    
Base<int> will not get instantiated. :P –  Nawaz May 23 '11 at 6:56
2  
@Nawaz Sorry, please be less cryptic. –  nbt May 23 '11 at 6:58
1  
@Nawaz A good point - I wonder what GCC is doing in this case? The code I posted compiles and runs. –  nbt May 23 '11 at 7:00
1  
@Neil: Oh it will not compile if Base attempts to use the private nested class A: ideone.com/09HX1 –  Nawaz May 23 '11 at 7:02
2  
@Nawaz: unless you perform explicit instantiation, members of a class template will be compiled only on demand. That is, if you only use push_back on a vector, the compiler will not compile insert. In this particular case, the inner type was not used, and as such the compiler is not required to diagnose errors there--a conforming compiler could also fail with that code, that is a quality of implementation detail. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 23 '11 at 8:18

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