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can anyone help?

I am trying to get the full stacktrace when within a catch of try..catch. Currently its truncated to include only the current method where the error is....

Let me explain.. Currently i my stacktrace includes the method "Third" where the error happens but First and Second isn't included, i believe this is by design.

private void First()
{
    this.Second();
}

private void Second()
{
    this.Third();
}

private void Third()
{
    try
    {
        throw new SystemException("ERROR HERE!");
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // I WILL LOG THE EXCEPTION object "EX" here ! but ex.StackTrace is truncated!
    }
}

I have seen a number of tricks to get the full stacktrace in a STRING but problem is my logging framework expects a object of type "Exception", but my variable (ex) which has my exception is valid but the property StackTrace is truncated.

Is there anyway i can receive a FULL exception with a FULL stacktrace so i am able to still send along my "EX" but this time it will have an UNtruncated stacktrace.

UnhandledErrror event seems to work as if i arrive here the Exception has a stack trace and is fully populated ...

I would really appreciated any feedback..

share|improve this question
2  
But you are catching at level 3. If you catch on top you get the full stack..? –  flq May 23 '11 at 7:53
1  
um, ex.ToString() should give you that... –  Yaur May 23 '11 at 7:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                First();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.StackTrace);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static void First()
        {
            Second();

        }

        private static void Second()
        {
            Third();

        }

        private static void Third()
        {
            throw new SystemException("ERROR HERE!");
        }
    }

The output in this case is:

   at stack.Program.Third() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 37
   at stack.Program.Second() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 31
   at stack.Program.First() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 25
   at stack.Program.Main(String[] args) in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:li
ne 14

Update: I suddenly had doubts, and ran through all the solutions presented thus far. They all work, though Environment.StackTrace is the easiest. Here's what the output looks like:

==ex.StackTrace==
   at stack.Program.Third() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 35

==Environment.StackTrace per Guillaume/Jorge Córdoba==
   at stack.Program.Third() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 35   at S
ystem.Environment.GetStackTrace(Exception e, Boolean needFileInfo)
   at System.Environment.get_StackTrace()
   at stack.Program.Third() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 44
   at stack.Program.Second() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 27
   at stack.Program.First() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 21
   at stack.Program.Main(String[] args) in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:li
ne 15
   at System.AppDomain._nExecuteAssembly(Assembly assembly, String[] args)
   at System.AppDomain.ExecuteAssembly(String assemblyFile, Evidence assemblySec
urity, String[] args)
   at Microsoft.VisualStudio.HostingProcess.HostProc.RunUsersAssembly()
   at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart_Context(Object state)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, C
ontextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart()

==ex.ToString() per danyolgiax==
System.SystemException: ERROR HERE!
   at stack.Program.Third() in C:\Temp\customers\stack\Program.cs:line 35

==GetFrame(i) per MBen==
Void Third(): (line 52)
Void Second(): (line 27)
Void First(): (line 21)
Void Main(System.String[]): (line 15)
Int32 _nExecuteAssembly(System.Reflection.Assembly, System.String[]): (line 0)
Int32 ExecuteAssembly(System.String, System.Security.Policy.Evidence, System.Str
ing[]): (line 0)
Void RunUsersAssembly(): (line 0)
Void ThreadStart_Context(System.Object): (line 0)
Void Run(System.Threading.ExecutionContext, System.Threading.ContextCallback, Sy
stem.Object): (line 0)
Void ThreadStart(): (line 0)
share|improve this answer
1  
Hey Tofutim, yep it appears this works :-) It works if i have the Try ... Catch round the "First", i have a kind of history. But if i catch the exception in Third (where it happens) then First, Second are not reported. THis is where i am a bit confused. –  Martin May 23 '11 at 15:09
    
You can get the whole exception in Third if you get the stacktrace from Environment.StackTrace per my update. –  tofutim May 23 '11 at 17:42
string fullStackTrace = exception.StackTrace + Environment.StackTrace;

The current method may be added two times, if so, remove one line from one of the properties.

share|improve this answer
    
I need the object "Exception", not a string. –  Martin May 23 '11 at 15:01
1  
Well, you said "I WILL LOG THE EXCEPTION object "EX" here ! but ex.StackTrace is truncated!" ex.StackTrace is a string. If you don't want a string tell us what you need. –  Guillaume May 23 '11 at 15:33

You need something like this :

        private static void Third()
        {
        try
        {
            throw new SystemException("ERROR HERE!");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // I WILL LOG THE EXCEPTION object "EX" here ! but ex.StackTrace is truncated!
            StackTrace st = new StackTrace(true);
            for (int i = 0; i < st.FrameCount; i++)
            {
                // Note that high up the call stack, there is only
                // one stack frame.
                StackFrame sf = st.GetFrame(i);
                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.WriteLine("High up the call stack, Method: {0}",
                                  sf.GetMethod());

                Console.WriteLine("High up the call stack, Line Number: {0}",
                                  sf.GetFileLineNumber());
            }
        }
    }

Check this article for more info : StackStace class

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a string, I need the "ExceptioN" object –  Martin May 23 '11 at 15:03
    
Well using the StackTrace class you can build up your own ExceptionClass. –  MBen May 23 '11 at 15:40

You don't understand how stack trace work. What is included in an exception trace is the "route" short to speak that the exception has traveled to reach the point where you're handling it.

Thus, on your example, it hasn't traveled at all yet, it's still in the "Third" method. If it would bubble up to "Second", then it would have gone across Third, to Second, and you'll be getting that on the stack trace.

I think what you actually want is the CallStack. Is the same concept, but the trace that's included in the exception is actually included "backwards" sort to speak, as the exception travels "up" to the place where it is handled.

Try logging the CallStack where you handle the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Jorge, Thanks for the reply. I am calling in this order, First, Second, Third. So in third where the exception is, it has travelled from frist to second to third.. Do you mean that the history of StackTrace starts when the error occurs hence in Third if i handle it I only have Third included in stacktrace? If i don't handle it there, it back tracks to Second and then to First. If i try .. catch in first i have a history of the exception back tracking from third to first?? –  Martin May 23 '11 at 15:11
    
Does that make sense? –  Martin May 23 '11 at 15:12
    
That's it. So by catching the exception on third you don't get the information about first and second in the stacktrace. –  Jorge Córdoba May 25 '11 at 10:45
private void First()
{
    try
    {
        this.Second();
    }  
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        string fullstack=ex.ToString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This just gives: SystemException: Exception here, and the line where it happened, it doesn't give the full stack –  MBen May 23 '11 at 8:06
    
This gives a string and not the object "Exception" that i need for my logging –  Martin May 23 '11 at 15:03

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