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I have a String str = "abcdefghij", and I want to set str2 to str minus the 4th to 6th character (assuming 0 based index).

Is it possible to do this in one go? slice! seems to do it, but it requires atleast 3 statements (duplicating, slicing, and then using the string).

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3 Answers 3

Depending on what exactly you're deleting, http://ruby-doc.org/core/classes/String.html#M001201 might be an option.

You could probably do obscene things with regexes:

"abcdefghij".sub(/(.{4}).{2}/) { $1 }

But that's gross.

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A common way is to do it like this:

str = "abcdefghij"
str2 = str.dup
str2[4..6] = ''
# => "abcdhij"

but it still requires two steps.

If the range you want is continuous, then you can do it in one step

str2 = str[2..5]
# => "cdef"
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OMG, I'm looking stupid now :) –  fl00r May 23 '11 at 9:10
    
@fl00r My answer still needs two steps. It is a difficult question. –  sawa May 23 '11 at 9:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I went ahead with using the following:

str = "abcdefghij"
str2 = str[0, 4] + str[7..-1]

It turned out to be faster and cleaner than the other solutions presented. Here's a mini benchmark.

require 'benchmark'

str = "abcdefghij"
times = 1_000_000
Benchmark.bmbm do |bm|
  bm.report("1 step") do
    times.times do
      str2 = str[0, 4] + str[7..-1]
    end
  end
  bm.report("3 steps") do
    times.times do
      str2 = str.dup
      str2[4..6] = ''
      str2
    end
  end
end

Output on Ruby 1.9.2

Rehearsal -------------------------------------------
1 step    0.950000   0.010000   0.960000 (  0.955288)
3 steps   1.250000   0.000000   1.250000 (  1.250415)
---------------------------------- total: 2.210000sec

              user     system      total        real
1 step    0.960000   0.000000   0.960000 (  0.950541)
3 steps   1.250000   0.010000   1.260000 (  1.254416)

Edit: Update for <<.

Script:

require 'benchmark'

str = "abcdefghij"
times = 1_000_000
Benchmark.bmbm do |bm|
  bm.report("1 step") do
    times.times do
      str2 = str[0, 4] + str[7..-1] 
    end
  end
  bm.report("3 steps") do
    times.times do
      str2 = str.dup
      str2[4..6] = ''
      str2
    end
  end
  bm.report("1 step using <<") do
    times.times do
      str2 = str[0, 4] << str[7..-1] 
    end
  end
end

Output on Ruby 1.9.2

Rehearsal ---------------------------------------------------
1 step            0.980000   0.010000   0.990000 (  0.979944)
3 steps           1.270000   0.000000   1.270000 (  1.265495)
1 step using <<   0.910000   0.010000   0.920000 (  0.909705)
------------------------------------------ total: 3.180000sec

                      user     system      total        real
1 step            0.980000   0.000000   0.980000 (  0.985154)
3 steps           1.280000   0.000000   1.280000 (  1.281310)
1 step using <<   0.930000   0.000000   0.930000 (  0.916511)
share|improve this answer
    
str[0, 4] + str[7..-1] came to my mind, but I didn't think you would want it because it's three steps. And, why is mine three steps instead of two? I don't understand what you mean by steps. The question also sounds like you are interested in using least steps rather than the fastest way. –  sawa May 23 '11 at 20:37
    
@sawa, by steps I meant statements. In order to use the final string in another statement (a function call for example), I'll have to write a total of 3 statements. –  Dogbert May 23 '11 at 20:43
    
OH, just another thing, I was recently curious as to find out what would be the fastest way to concatenate a string in Ruby, and the + operator is significantly slower than the << operator. So, I suggest doing something like str2 = str[0, 4] << str[7..-1]. Cheers! (Great answer, by the way, loved it +1) –  destiel starship Jul 3 '11 at 8:34
    
@with a dot, Ah, I didn't think of using << with strings created on the fly, but you're right. In that case, there will be slightly less overhead (1 less object creation). Some simple tests show me that that it's around 15% faster in this case. I'll update the benchmarks. –  Dogbert Jul 3 '11 at 8:39
    
@Dogbert =O That was fast. LOL! Okay, now I've come to a simple conclusion: You're awesome. :D –  destiel starship Jul 3 '11 at 8:43

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