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I have a: header.cpp, header.hpp and a test_header.cpp.

In header.hpp i've i have:

class MyClass
  {
    public;
    MyClass();
    std::string name;
    //...code with other variables,methods;

 class MySecondClass
  {

    public:
    MySecondClass();

    std::string surname;
    //..code with other variables,methods

  }*MySC;

   public:
   template<class T>
   bool method(T& obj);

    {



    if (typeid(MyClass)=typeid(obj))
     {
       MyClass *s= new MyClass();
        *s=obj //i want to save everything that i have in obj into s;
        //call  method "MyMethod" and work with s

    }
     else if (typeid(MyClass::MySecondClass)=typeid(obj))
      {
        MyClass::MySecondClass *s1= new MyClass::MySecondClass();
        *s1 = obj;
        //call "MyMethod" and work with s1;
      }
     return true;
  }

}*mycls;

In test_header.cpp I have

{
  MyClass *mycls = new MyClass();
  MyClass::MySecondClass *mysec_cls= new MyClass::MySecondClass();

   if (mycls->method<MyClass>(*mycls) 
              {//code
               }
   if (mycls->method<MyClass::MySecondClass>(*mysec_cls)
           {//code
           }
}

I have an error saying that mysec_cls is not of type MyClass. As i've realised the pointer goes to the first if and never on else.

.h error: no match for operator= in *s1 = obj. 
note: candidates are: MyClass& MyClass::operator=(const MyClass&)

I don't have this error if in test_header.cpp i have just one if and if in template i only have the reference from the if in test_header, but if ihave more than one refference to T& obj i have the error i've mentioned.

Why? how to change this? i am compiling using g++.

share|improve this question
1  
Could you fix the indentation on your code snippet please? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 23 '11 at 9:28
    
Completely unreadable. –  nbt May 23 '11 at 9:31
    
a clear case where simple overloading will save you a lot of effort.. anyway, you're code is incomprehensible - you need to put together a clearer example, and you are likely to get some answers... –  Nim May 23 '11 at 9:32
    
i've edit my code:) –  marryy May 23 '11 at 9:35
1  
From your question, it sounds like you've removed the code that's obviously faulty: //using std::type_info& and typeid i obtain the ype of the obj; in the std::string s i retain the name of the obj and after that.. –  Tony D May 23 '11 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you instantiate a template it gets fully compiled, independently of what branches of the code will get eventually executed. In your particular code, even if the if statement will ensure that only the branch that has the valid assignment gets executed, both branches must be compiled, and one of them is not correct.

Consider the simple non templated example:

void foo( int x ) {
   if ( true ) {
      int y = x;
   } else {
      std::string s = x;
   }
}

While the second branch will never be executed, the compiler must ensure that the code is correct (even if it can optimize it away), and it will fail as you cannot initialize a string from an integer. The same problem is present in your code.

As to how to solve it, the simplest way would be that instead of writing branches you use function overload resolution to resolve the dispatch to the appropriate piece of code. That way you can have two different functions (or specializations if you want, but I'd recommend different overloads), each of which works only with one of the types, so that the assignment is valid.

share|improve this answer
    
You could have posted this in your old post (after erasing it). –  Nawaz May 23 '11 at 9:55
2  
Once I realized the answer was wrong, I deleted it immediately, I did not want anyone to get confused in the mean-time with a wrong answer while I wrote this one. For most people the old answer does not even appear anymore, and for those of us that can see it, it appears at the end of the list. I think we have a different point of view to this respect (from what I have seen in the past), to me this is not a modification to the old answer, but rather a new different one. Modifying the answer (rather than editing for minor mistakes or additional info) only makes things more confusing to others. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 23 '11 at 10:03
1  
@Nawaz: This discussion can get as long as we both want, you believe that there should be less posts because you somehow feel that the extra greyed out post at the end is disturbing. I believe that an incorrect answer is to be deleted, even if a correct is to be added, and the premise is that otherwise any extra information attached to the question will be misleading. This is not the particular case today, but you can go back to your answers, and figure out how many of the comments left in your modified answers are unrelated to the final version of your answer. I find that much more disturbing –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 23 '11 at 12:10
1  
@David: Yes. And that is the very thing I'm saying. After deleting the post you can edit it, re-edit it, thousands of times, and once you're done, you can again undelete it so that others can see it. I think it avoids unnecessary new post. –  Nawaz May 23 '11 at 15:17
1  
I agree with David. It's a completely separate answer, that should have a new post date, reset votes, no comments. I understand the re-use principle and sometimes it fits, but people re-using questions and answers by completely changing them through edits is downright irritating. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 31 '11 at 8:40

My crystal ball tells me that you are somehow transmogrifying the class name you retrieve from the type_info, as this name is not directly a class name, but rather an implementation-defined string that is sufficiently derived from the class name to allow equality comparison, and that in that process, both names are mapped to "MyClass" (i.e. you are cutting off the inner class's name), hence both end up in the same handler.

If you want to compare types at runtime, compare the type_info nodes directly:

if(typeid(obj) == typeid(MyClass)) ...

If you have a closed list of types you handle in method (and in your implementation, there is, because you cannot add more cases to a list of chained if statements), there is no real reason to use a template; a regular overload is enough:

class MyClass
{
    std::string name;
    // ...
    class MySecondClass
    {
        std::string surname;
        // ...
    } *mysc;

    bool method(MyClass const &obj)
    {
        MyClass *copy = new MyClass;
        *copy = obj;
        // ...
    }
    bool method(MySecondClass const &obj)
    {
        MySecondClass *copy = new MySecondClass;
        *copy = obj;
        // ...
    }
    // ...
};
share|improve this answer
    
While OP's method of using typeid is wrong and ridiculous, it's not the source of the error, because the code fails to compile and typeid is runtime thing. –  Jan Hudec May 23 '11 at 9:49
    
i've edited the code –  marryy May 23 '11 at 9:49
    
+1 though, because this is how the code should have looked in the first place. –  Jan Hudec May 23 '11 at 9:52
    
... oh, MyClass *copy = new MyClass(obj) would do it some justice too. –  Jan Hudec May 23 '11 at 9:59
    
i don't know how to solve the error i did edit the code.need some help:) –  marryy May 23 '11 at 12:01

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