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Any time I add class via VS Wizard, I have these implementations:

class CDxWindow
{
public:
    CDxWindow(void);
    ~CDxWindow(void);
};

Usually I delete voids.

But maybe is there any reason of leaving them in the code?

Why does Microsoft added void there?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C a function declared with no parameters is assumed to take a single integer parameter. Declaring the function with a void parameter list tells the compiler not to assume this default.

This doesn't apply in C++, so the void is unnecessary.

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1  
Actually, in C, a function declared with no parameters (e.g. void f();) must be called with the same number and same type of parameters that it has been defined, but the compiler won't check it. – Frerich Raabe May 25 '11 at 8:23
    
More info, and this is from here: If the function does not return a value, use the keyword void as the type specifier. If the function does not take any parameters, use the keyword void rather than an empty parameter list to indicate that the function is not passed any arguments. In C, a function with an empty parameter list signifies a function that takes an unknown number of parameters; in C++, it means it takes no parameters. – RobH May 25 '11 at 8:34

No reason, just someone being pedantic. You can safely delete void here if you want to.

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I cannot tell you WHY they decided to do this, but all I know is that in C this is a construct to say there is no args to the function, so maybe that's what they are trying to say.

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