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my problem is quite simple, but I cannot find any solution. Lets say i have the following:

Table food:
id (key);
category_id;
food_id

Table category:
category_id (key);
category_names [fruits, vegetables]

Table fruits
food_id (key);
fruit [apple, banana]

Table vegetables
food_id (key);
vegetable [bean, carrot]

I now want to build a foreign key constraint from table food to the tables fruits + vegetables, depending on the category, specified in category_id. Is this possible?

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3 Answers 3

If your problem is really that simple, then just use VIEWS:

CREATE TABLE food (
  id SERIAL,
  name TEXT NOT NULL,
  category TEXT NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY(id),
  CHECK(category = 'fruit' OR category = 'veggie')
);
CREATE UNIQUE INDEX food_name_udx ON food(name);

CREATE VIEW fruit AS
  SELECT id, name FROM food WHERE category = 'fruit';

CREATE VIEW veggie AS
  SELECT id, name FROM food WHERE category = 'veggie';

Use DOMAINS or an external table with a FOREIGN KEY CONSTRAINT if category grows beyond 5-10 entries.

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No my problem isnt that simple. Maybe my food example wasnt that good. I'm a database-beginner and I now found that a many-to-many relation between category and fruits/vegetables, where the food table serves as an association table, was what I wanted. Thank you all for your help! –  gruenkohl Jun 15 '11 at 9:39

Foreign keys can only reference primary keys or unique keys. Your food.food_id is neither. That's the technical aspect. From the schema design point of view, I'm not sure if you may have too many tables for your purpose.

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I want to reference primary keys: either fruits.food_id or vegetables.food_id... depending on the category specified in the food-table. You think, I can go with, in this example, only 3 tables? Fruits and vegetables are supposed to be two completely different tables. –  gruenkohl May 23 '11 at 12:10
    
As you wish. But one foreign key cannot reference several primary keys. You should model it the inverse way, i.e. make food_id the primary key of food and reference it from "child tables". There you can have a primary key AND foreign key in the same field. –  Lukas Eder May 23 '11 at 12:19

I'd change your model to this:

Table food:
id (key);
name;
category_id;

Table category:
category_id (key);
category_names [fruits, vegetables]

i can't see why you need a table for the fruits and vegetables, except if those tables have different relations to other tables..

you could also read this page about modeling subclasses in a database

Good Luck!

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