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I'm new to R programming and just started to learn it, and i need you to help me with this issue please.

I have 2 data frames :

the first(df1):

    V1 V2
    A  A 
    A  B 
    A  C 
    B  A 
    B  B 
    B  C 

etc

the second(df2) :

V1  Va   Vb
A   12   23
B   15   53
C   321  543
D   54   325
etc..

Use this code to generate the sample data.

df1 <- data.frame(
  V1 = rep(LETTERS[1:2], each = 3L),
  V2 = rep.int(LETTERS[1:3], 2L)
)
dfr2 <- data.frame(
  Va = c(12, 15, 312, 54),
  Vb = c(23, 53, 543, 325)
)

I need to take the Va and Vb from df2 and place them in df1 based on V1 and V2 of df1.

so I want this output:

df3:

V1   V2  Va1  Vb1 Va2 Vb2
A    A   12    23  12  23
A    B   12    23  15  23
A    C   12    23  321 543
B    A   15    23  12   23
B    B   15    23  15   23
B    C   15    23  321  543

hope that this can be done in R without a dozenz of for loops :S.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the power of match() for this, provided the names in df1$V1 are unique :

#some data
df1 <- data.frame(
  V1 = rep(c("A","B"),each=3),
  V2 = rep(LETTERS[1:3],2)  
)
df2 <- data.frame(V1=LETTERS[1:3],Va=1:3,Vb=3:1)

out <- cbind(df1,
  df2[match(df1$V1,df2$V1),-1],
  df2[match(df1$V2,df2$V1),-1]
)
names(out)[3:6] <- c("Va1","Vb1","Va2","Vb2")
rownames(out) <- 1:nrow(out)

Gives

> out
    V1 V2 Va1 Vb1 Va2 Vb2
1    A  A   1   3   1   3
2    A  B   1   3   2   2
3    A  C   1   3   3   1
4    B  A   2   2   1   3
5    B  B   2   2   2   2
6    B  C   2   2   3   1

You'll have to rename the columns manually, as you would get multiple columns with the same name. Although it's technically possible in a dataframe, it can cause trouble later on. You can automatize this using something along the lines of:

names(out) <- 
    c("V1","V2",
      sapply(names(df2)[2:3],paste,1:2,sep="")
    )

EDIT : for big dataframes, conversion to matrices makes another huge difference. One has to pay attention to the intrinsic changes in type for the different variables. The speedup is due to the fact that cbind and merge take a whole lot of time figuring out the correct types for each variable.

With following data and functions :

n <- 1e5
df1 <- data.frame(V1 = rep(LETTERS,each=n),V2 = rep(LETTERS,n),
        stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
df2 <- data.frame(V1=LETTERS,Va=1:26,Vb=26:1,stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

fast_JM <- function(df1,df2){
  out <- cbind(
    as.matrix(df2[,-1])[match(df1$V1,df2$V1),],
    as.matrix(df2[,-1])[match(df1$V2,df2$V1),]
  )
  out <- as.data.frame(out)
  names(out) <- sapply(names(df2)[2:3],paste,1:2,sep="")
  out$V1 <- df1$V1
  out$V2 <- df1$V2
  out
}

slow_JM <- function(df1,df2){
  out <- cbind(df1,
    df2[match(df1$V1,df2$V1),-1],
    df2[match(df1$V2,df2$V1),-1]
  )
  names(out)[3:6] <- c("Va1","Vb1","Va2","Vb2")
  out
}


double_merge <- function(df1,df2){
  merge(merge(df1, df2), df2, by.x = "V2", by.y = "V1", suffixes = c("1", "2"))

}

the benchmarking becomes :

require(rbenchmark)
benchmark(fast_JM(df1,df2),slow_JM(df1,df2),double_merge(df1,df2),
      replications=1,columns=c("test","elapsed","relative"),order="relative")

                    test elapsed relative
1      fast_JM(df1, df2)    0.89  1.00000
2      slow_JM(df1, df2)   12.54 14.08989
3 double_merge(df1, df2)   42.50 47.75281

So a speedup of more than 40 times compared to the double merge, and more than 10 times compared to using dataframes.

share|improve this answer
    
@Joris Meys : thanks , i will try it , but i have a question, why did you used -1 at the end here : df2[match(df1$V2,df2$V1),-1] –  smack May 23 '11 at 13:54
    
@smack : to drop the first column, which is df2$V1. You don't need that in your dataframe. If you have a small dataframe, the method of @Chase might be easier to understand. It will take about 4 times as long on big dataframes though. –  Joris Meys May 23 '11 at 14:00
    
@Joris Meys : thank you very much , it worked. –  smack May 23 '11 at 14:21
    
@Joris Meys : in the new df i got a new column , looks like id or something , but the values are weired (449.105 , 2161.358 ,....) is it normal ??? and how can i remove them?? –  smack May 23 '11 at 14:42
    
@smack : that's not a column, those are the rownames. You can get rid of those by using rownames(out) <- 1:nrow(out) –  Joris Meys May 23 '11 at 14:46

You can use merge() twice to get what you want. By default, merge looks for common column names to join. In the second merge, we'll specify the column we want it to merge on:

df1 <- data.frame(V1 = c('A', 'A', 'A', 'B', 'B', 'B'), V2 = c('A', 'B', 'C', 'A', 'B', 'C'))
df2 <- data.frame(V1 = c('A', 'B', 'C', 'D'), Va = c(12, 15, 321, 54), Vb = c(23, 53, 543, 325))

merge(merge(df1, df2), df2, by.x = "V2", by.y = "V1", suffixes = c("1", "2"))
share|improve this answer
    
on larger dataframes, the double call to merge will become very costly. +1 for the suffixes though –  Joris Meys May 23 '11 at 13:56
    
thanks for your help –  smack May 23 '11 at 14:21
    
@Joris - good point. I often default to merge() since I can mentally draw parallels between merge() and the join operators in SQL which I have a lot more experience with than R. –  Chase May 23 '11 at 14:35
    
But merge allows for non-unique entries in df1, which may be valuable. The match() solution does not appear to do so... so +1 for merge() as universal, even if costly. –  Hendy Jun 11 '14 at 19:21

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