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I have this simple PSGI application (app.psgi).

use strict;
use warnings;

my $app = sub {
    my $mem = `ps -o rss= -p $$`;
    $mem =~ s/^\s*|\s*$//gs;
    return [ 200, [ 'Content-Type' => 'text/text' ], [ $mem ]];
};

I was requested the above 1000 times and got increased memory usage. Depending on how was started the server, got:

  • plackup - memory usage is raising at first 3 requests and remain constant for the next 997 requests

  • plackup -r - memory usage is randomly raising (not at every request) by 4k.

  • starman - like above, the memory usage is randomly raising by 4k, but with slower rate

The question is:

  • WHY is raising the memory usage ? Where is the leak, and how achieve constant memory usage (especially on starman), because i don't want run out of memory at long run. (OK, it is possible define for example --max-requests 100), but it is not an answer for the memory usage.
  • or - what is wrong in my example?

If anyone want test this too - here is my script for the fetching:

use strict;
use warnings;
use LWP::UserAgent;
my $ua = LWP::UserAgent->new;
my $req = HTTP::Request->new(GET => 'http://localhost:5000');

my $old_mem = 0;
print "req#\tmem\n";
foreach my $i (1..1000) {
    my $res = $ua->request($req);
    (my $mem = $res->content) =~ s/\D//g;
    next if( $mem == $old_mem );
    print "$i\t$mem\n";
    $old_mem = $mem;
}

My results:

plackup                 plackup -r              starman
req#    mem             req#    mem             req#    mem
1       7780            1       3924            1       3280
2       7800            2       4296            5       3728
3       7804            3       4304            8       3280
                        ...                     ...
                        ... deleted             ... deleted
                        ...                     ...
                        839     4596            994     3912
                        866     4600            998     3908
                        962     4604            1000    3912

So,

  • why plackup raising in first 3 requests?
  • plackup -r - 4k increase (see last lines) - at the beginning much more
  • starman - raising too, but with default 5 workers in slower rate (3280->3912)

Versions:

# cpanm Plack Starman
Plack is up to date. (0.9979)
Starman is up to date. (0.2010)
# perl -v

This is perl 5, version 12, subversion 3 (v5.12.3) built for darwin-thread-multi-2level
share|improve this question
3  
"plackup - memory usage is raising at first 3 requests and remain constant for the next 997 requests" That means some modules are lazy-loaded in the first few requests. After that there's no leak. –  miyagawa May 23 '11 at 18:48
2  
Starman by default enables keep-alive and HTTP pipelining, meaning if you send 1000 requests in the short period of time you'll have these connections connected, unless you explicitly disconnect them. I can confirm this using ApacheBench - the memory temporarily increases, but when they disconnect/timeout, the memory gets down to where it was. –  miyagawa May 23 '11 at 19:02
    
wow. Thank you for the explanation. :) I was afraid that I have a problem with my perl or so. –  kobame May 23 '11 at 19:33
2  
I confirm I see the memory increase in the Restarter case (-r option) - I'll see if there's any place that is leaking. Because -r is usually used during the development I wouldn't consider it a huge deal - but it's always nice to have no leaks :) –  miyagawa May 23 '11 at 19:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Based on miyagava's comments the answer is:

"plackup - memory usage is raising at first 3 requests and remain constant for the next 997 requests" That means some modules are lazy-loaded in the first few requests. After that there's no leak. – miyagawa 14 hours ago

Starman by default enables keep-alive and HTTP pipelining, meaning if you send 1000 requests in the short period of time you'll have these connections connected, unless you explicitly disconnect them. I can confirm this using ApacheBench - the memory temporarily increases, but when they disconnect/timeout, the memory gets down to where it was. – miyagawa 14 hours ago

thanx.

share|improve this answer

Did you use the latest version? I cannot reproduce your output.

With "plackup":

sidburn@sid:~/perl/plack$ ./memory.pl 
req#    mem
1   5340
2   5380

With "plackup -r":

sidburn@sid:~/perl/plack$ ./memory.pl 
req#    mem
1   4860
2   5060

With "starman":

sidburn@sid:~/perl/plack$ ./memory.pl 
req#    mem
1   5176
5   5224
6   5176
7   5224

Versions:
Perl: 5.12.1 & 5.12.3
Plack: 0.9979
Starman: 0.2010

share|improve this answer
    
Yes: Plack is up to date. (0.9979) and starman was only 0.2008, but after the upgrade the result is the same... –  kobame May 23 '11 at 14:49
    
Is your Perl reasonably up-to-date? –  phaylon May 23 '11 at 14:52
    
havent 5.14 yet. This is perl 5, version 12, subversion 3 (v5.12.3) –  kobame May 23 '11 at 14:56
    
I used Perl 5.12.1 –  Sid Burn May 23 '11 at 15:01
    
It also works with Perl 5.12.3. On which system do you use it? Linux? Which? A special distribution? I used Debian Squeeze with perlbrew. –  Sid Burn May 23 '11 at 17:01

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