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How much is read from ThreadLocal variable slower than from regular field?

More concretely is simple object creation faster or slower than access to ThreadLocal variable?

I assume that it is fast enough so that having ThreadLocal<MessageDigest> instance is much faster then creating instance of MessageDigest every time. But does that also apply for byte[10] or byte[1000] for example?

Edit: Question is what is really going on when calling ThreadLocal's get? If that is just a field, like any other, then answer would be "it's always fastest", right?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Running unpublished benchmarks, ThreadLocal.get takes around 35 cycle per iteration on my machine. Not a great deal. In Sun's implementation a custom linear probing hash map in Thread maps ThreadLocals to values. Because it is only ever accessed by a single thread, it can be very fast.

Allocation of small objects take a similar number of cycles, although because of cache exhaustion you may get somewhat lower figures in a tight loop.

Construction of MessageDigest is likely to be relatively expensive. It has a fair amount of state and construction goes through the Provider SPI mechanism. You may be able to optimise by, for instance, cloning or providing the Provider.

Just because it may be faster to cache in a ThreadLocal rather than create does not necessarily mean that the system performance will increase. You will have additional overheads related to GC which slows everything down.

Unless your application very heavily uses MessageDigest you might want to consider using a conventional thread-safe cache instead.

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2  
IMHO, the fastest way is just to ignore the SPI and use something like new org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.SHA1Digest(). I'm quite sure no cache can beat it. –  maaartinus Mar 8 '11 at 1:40

Modern JVMs implement ThreadLocal using an unsynchronised HashMap in the Thread.currentThread() object. This makes it extremely fast (though not nearly as fast as using a regular field access, of course), as well as ensuring that the ThreadLocal object gets tidied up when the Thread dies.

Of course, new Object() is also very fast these days, and the Garbage Collectors are also very good at reclaiming short-lived objects.

Unless you are certain that object creation is going to be expensive, or you need to persist some state on a thread by thread basis, you are better off going for the simpler allocate when needed solution, and only switching over to a ThreadLocal implementation when a profiler tells you that you need to.

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3  
+1 for being the only answer to actually address the question. –  cletus Mar 4 '09 at 11:42

Good question, I've been asking myself that recently. To give you definite numbers, the benchmarks below (in Scala, compiled to virtually the same bytecodes as the equivalent Java code):

var cnt: String = ""
val tlocal = new java.lang.ThreadLocal[String] {
  override def initialValue = ""
}

def loop_heap_write = {                                                                                                                           
  var i = 0                                                                                                                                       
  val until = totalwork / threadnum                                                                                                               
  while (i < until) {                                                                                                                             
    if (cnt ne "") cnt = "!"                                                                                                                      
    i += 1                                                                                                                                        
  }                                                                                                                                               
  cnt                                                                                                                                          
} 

def threadlocal = {
  var i = 0
  val until = totalwork / threadnum
  while (i < until) {
    if (tlocal.get eq null) i = until + i + 1
    i += 1
  }
  if (i > until) println("thread local value was null " + i)
}

available here, were performed on an AMD 4x 2.8 GHz dual-cores and a quad-core i7 with hyperthreading (2.67 GHz).

These are the numbers:

i7

Specs: Intel i7 2x quad-core @ 2.67 GHz Test: scala.threads.ParallelTests

Test name: loop_heap_read

Thread num.: 1 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 9.0069 9.0036 9.0017 9.0084 9.0074 (avg = 9.1034 min = 8.9986 max = 21.0306 )

Thread num.: 2 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 4.5563 4.7128 4.5663 4.5617 4.5724 (avg = 4.6337 min = 4.5509 max = 13.9476 )

Thread num.: 4 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 2.3946 2.3979 2.3934 2.3937 2.3964 (avg = 2.5113 min = 2.3884 max = 13.5496 )

Thread num.: 8 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 2.4479 2.4362 2.4323 2.4472 2.4383 (avg = 2.5562 min = 2.4166 max = 10.3726 )

Test name: threadlocal

Thread num.: 1 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 91.1741 90.8978 90.6181 90.6200 90.6113 (avg = 91.0291 min = 90.6000 max = 129.7501 )

Thread num.: 2 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 45.3838 45.3858 45.6676 45.3772 45.3839 (avg = 46.0555 min = 45.3726 max = 90.7108 )

Thread num.: 4 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 22.8118 22.8135 59.1753 22.8229 22.8172 (avg = 23.9752 min = 22.7951 max = 59.1753 )

Thread num.: 8 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 22.2965 22.2415 22.3438 22.3109 22.4460 (avg = 23.2676 min = 22.2346 max = 50.3583 )

AMD

Specs: AMD 8220 4x dual-core @ 2.8 GHz Test: scala.threads.ParallelTests

Test name: loop_heap_read

Total work: 20000000 Thread num.: 1 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 12.625 12.631 12.634 12.632 12.628 (avg = 12.7333 min = 12.619 max = 26.698 )

Test name: loop_heap_read Total work: 20000000

Run times: (showing last 5) 6.412 6.424 6.408 6.397 6.43 (avg = 6.5367 min = 6.393 max = 19.716 )

Thread num.: 4 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 3.385 4.298 9.7 6.535 3.385 (avg = 5.6079 min = 3.354 max = 21.603 )

Thread num.: 8 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 5.389 5.795 10.818 3.823 3.824 (avg = 5.5810 min = 2.405 max = 19.755 )

Test name: threadlocal

Thread num.: 1 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 200.217 207.335 200.241 207.342 200.23 (avg = 202.2424 min = 200.184 max = 245.369 )

Thread num.: 2 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 100.208 100.199 100.211 103.781 100.215 (avg = 102.2238 min = 100.192 max = 129.505 )

Thread num.: 4 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 62.101 67.629 62.087 52.021 55.766 (avg = 65.6361 min = 50.282 max = 167.433 )

Thread num.: 8 Total tests: 200

Run times: (showing last 5) 40.672 74.301 34.434 41.549 28.119 (avg = 54.7701 min = 28.119 max = 94.424 )

Summary

A thread local is around 10-20x that of the heap read. It also seems to scale well on this JVM implementation and these architectures with the number of processors.

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+1 Kudos on being the only one to give quantitative results. I'm a bit skeptical because these tests are in Scala, but like you said, the Java bytecodes should be similar... –  Gravity Sep 1 '11 at 22:39
    
Thanks! This while loop results in virtually the same bytecode as the corresponding Java code would produce. Different times could be observed on different VMs, though - this has been tested on a Sun JVM1.6. –  axel22 Sep 1 '11 at 22:46

Offtopic: ThreadLocal tend to be a memory problem in server applications where threads live forever as worker threads. You might pile up data without even knowing it.

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@Pete is correct test before you optimise.

I would be very surprised if constructing a MessageDigest has any serious overhead when compared to actaully using it.

Miss using ThreadLocal can be a source of leaks and dangling references, that don't have a clear life cycle, generally I don't ever use ThreadLocal without a very clear plan of when a particular resource will be removed.

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Build it and measure it.

Also, you only need one threadlocal if you encapsulate your message digesting behaviour into an object. If you need a local MessageDigest and a local byte[1000] for some purpose, create an object with a messageDigest and a byte[] field and put that object into the ThreadLocal rather than both individually.

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Thanks, MessageDigest and byte[] are different uses, so one object isn't needed. –  Sarmun Mar 4 '09 at 9:47

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