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I'd like to use a Mixin to always add some init functionality to my child classes which each inherit from different API base classes. Specifically, I'd like to make multiple different child classes that inherit from one of these different API-supplied base classes and the one Mixin, which will always have the Mixin initialization code executed in the same way, without code replication. However, it seems that the __init__ function of the Mixin class never gets called unless I explicitly call it in the Child class's __init__ function, which is less than ideal. I've built up a simple test case:

class APIBaseClassOne(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print (" base ")

class SomeMixin(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print (" mixin before ")
        super(SomeMixin, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        print (" mixin after ")

class MyClass(APIBaseClassOne):
    pass

class MixedClass(MyClass, SomeMixin):
    pass

As you can see in the following output, the Mixin function's init never gets called:

>>> import test
>>> test.MixedClass()
 base
<test.MixedClass object at 0x1004cc850>

Is there a way to do this (have an init function in a Mixin get called) without writing every child class to explicitly invoke the Mixin's init function? (i.e., without having to do something like this in every class:)

class MixedClass(MyClass, SomeMixin):
    def __init__(*args, **kwargs):
        SomeMixin.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
        MyClass.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs) 

Btw, if all my child classes were inheriting from same base class, I realize I could create a new middle class that inherits from the base class and the mixin and keep it DRY that way. However, they inherit from different base classes with common functionality. (Django Field classes, to be precise).

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1  
In general, using multiple inheritance with base classes that weren't designed for it is a bad idea. Mix-in classes are usually designed together, and mixing-in arbitrary classes produces such messes. In any case, if both base classes each have an __init__ method, how should the interpreter know which one to call, or in which order to call them? –  André Caron May 23 '11 at 15:44
    
@André Caron: It could determine the order like C++ does, where base classes are initialized in declaration order. –  martineau May 23 '11 at 16:05
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Sorry I saw this so late, but

class MixedClass2(SomeMixin, MyClass):
    pass

>>> m = MixedClass2()
 mixin before 
 base 
 mixin after

The pattern @Ignacio is talking about is called cooperative multiple inheritance, and it's great. But if a base class isn't interested in cooperating, make it the second base, and your mixin the first. The mixin's __init__() (and anything else it defines) will be checked before the base class, following Python's MRO.

This should solve the general question, though I'm not sure it handles your specific use. Base classes with custom metaclasses (like Django models) or with strange decorators (like @martineau's answer ;) can do crazy things.

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1  
Even if it was late, this boils it down nicely (although the other answers provide some really good teaching)-- ultimately, an understanding of Python MRO seems critical before embarking on any multiple-inheritance adventures, or unexpected things will happen. THanks! –  Ben Roberts May 2 '12 at 18:30
    
Welcome! Absolutely right, it's unfortunate the the MRO is presented as an advanced topic :/ –  Matt Luongo May 3 '12 at 2:17
1  
+1 This is the most elegant answer I've seen so far. –  martineau May 7 '12 at 17:15
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Have the base class invoke super().__init__() even though it is a subclass of object. That way all the __init__() methods will be run.

class BaseClassOne(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(BaseClassOne, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        print (" base ")
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I didn't realize that calling super would cause all __init__() methods to be run. Unfortunately BaseClassOne is an API (Django) supplied base class (i've updated my question to reflect this) but this may get me started in the right direction. –  Ben Roberts May 23 '11 at 15:18
3  
It won't cause all of them to be run, but it will cause the next one to be run, even if it's in a mixin. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 23 '11 at 15:19
    
Learn something new every day ... ;-) Thanks. –  Santa May 23 '11 at 16:44
    
In a multiple-inheritance situation, all classes should use super() to find the next class to initialize. –  kindall May 23 '11 at 16:45
    
@kindall: I think many have missed the point that the OP can't change BaseClassOne because it part of an API they have no control over. –  martineau May 23 '11 at 17:24
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Python performs no implicit calls to the __init__ methods of a class's super-class(es) -- but you can make it happen semi-automatically. One way is by defining a metaclass for your mixed classes that creates or replaces the class's __init__ method with one that calls to all the listed bases' __init__ functions in the order listed. Another is to use a class decorator function, as shown in my Edit below.

This illustrates what I'm suggesting:

class APIBaseClassOne(object):  # API class (can't be changed)
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print '  APIBaseClassOne.__init__()'

class SomeMixin(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print '  SomeMixin.__init__()'

class MixedClassMeta(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, classdict):
        classinit = classdict.get('__init__')  # could be None
        # define an __init__ function for the new class
        def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
            # call the __init__ functions of all the bases
            for base in type(self).__bases__:
                base.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
            # also call any __init__ function that was in the new class
            if classinit:  classinit(self, *args, **kwargs)
        # add the local function to the new class
        classdict['__init__'] = __init__
        return type.__new__(cls, name, bases, classdict)

class MixedClass(APIBaseClassOne, SomeMixin):
    __metaclass__ = MixedClassMeta  # important
    # if exists, is called after the __init__'s of all the direct base classes
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print '  MixedClass.__init__()'

print 'MixedClass:'
MixedClass()

Outputs:

MixedClass:
  APIBaseClassOne.__init__()
  SomeMixin.__init__()
  MixedClass.__init__()

Edit:

Here's how to do the same thing with a class decorator (Python 2.6+):

class APIBaseClassOne(object):  # API class (can't be changed)
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print '  APIBaseClassOne.__init__()'

class SomeMixin(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print '  SomeMixin.__init__()'

def mixedomatic(cls):
    """ mixedin class decorator """
    classinit = getattr(cls, '__init__', None)
    # define an __init__ function for the class
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # call the __init__ functions of all the bases
        for base in cls.__bases__:
            base.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
        # also call any __init__ function that was in the class
        if classinit:  classinit(self, *args, **kwargs)
    # make the local function the class's __init__
    setattr(cls, '__init__', __init__)
    return cls

@mixedomatic
class MixedClass(APIBaseClassOne, SomeMixin):
    # if exists, is called after the __init__'s of all the direct base classes
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print '  MixedClass.__init__()'

print 'MixedClass:'
MixedClass()

(For Python < 2.6, use MixedClass = mixedomatic(MixedClass) after the class definition.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for demonstrating this. While the discussion in the other answer has made me rethink whether its a good idea to begin with, this implementation works and I've learned a lot. –  Ben Roberts May 25 '11 at 4:16
1  
@Ben: Yes, mixins are somewhat controversial, and even considered harmful by some, plus using them in Python is somewhat complicated by the fact that it doesn't call base class constructors by default (unlike, say, C++ would). However their use may be justified in a situation like yours where you can't modify the API's class -- but you might want to think more about alternatives to do what you need like subclassing or wrapping the API's class instead. Another possibility might be to make an instance of it an attribute of one of your own classes. –  martineau May 25 '11 at 14:48
    
I'd be interested in hearing the reason for the downvote... –  martineau Jun 14 '11 at 3:24
    
not sure, wish i could accept both, but yours has been re-accepted :) –  Ben Roberts Dec 3 '11 at 22:46
    
@Ben: Thanks. I can understand your dilemma, but my [biased] opinion is that mine is better because not only does it actually solve your particular problem, it manages to do so in a generic way -- and is thus a little more complicated than just calling the base class's init(). Real world problems can be like that. –  martineau Dec 4 '11 at 1:02
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instead of:

class MixedClass(MyClass, SomeMixin):
    def __init__(*args, **kwargs):
        SomeMixin.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
        MyClass.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)

you can do this:

class MixedClass(MyClass, SomeMixin):
    def __init__(*args, **kwargs):
        for base in MixedClass.__bases__:
            base.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)

you can use reversed(MixedClass.__bases__) for reversed order.

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1  
Sorry for the downvote, but Python has an mro for a reason. –  Matt Luongo Feb 2 '12 at 15:31
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