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why is the following php code not working:

$string = "123";
$search = "123";

if(strpos($string,$search))
{
    echo "found";
}else{
    echo "not found";
}

as $search is in $string - shouldn't it be triggered as found?

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See the first example on php.net/manual/en/function.strpos.php. You need === to compare it –  AllisonC May 23 '11 at 15:27
    
To eschew that issue, learn to use strstr instead. –  mario May 23 '11 at 23:01

8 Answers 8

This is mentioned in the Manual: strpos()

This function may return Boolean FALSE, but may also return a non-Boolean value which evaluates to FALSE, such as 0 or "". Please read the section on Booleans for more information. Use the === operator for testing the return value of this function.

In your case the string is found at the index 0 and in php 0 == false

The solution is to just use the strict comparator

echo strpos($string,$search) === false
     ? "not found"
     : "found";

Another one

echo is_int(strpos($string,$search))
     ? "found"
     : "not found";

Or something ... lets say interesting :D Just for illustration. I don't recommend this one.

echo strpos('_' . $string,$search) // we just shift the string 1 to the right
     ? "found"
     : "not found";
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strpos returns the first offset where $search was found - 0. 0 in turn evaluates to false. Therefore the if fails.

If $search was not found, strpos returns FALSE. First check the return value for !== FALSE, and then check the offset.

Thanks to everyone who pointed this out in the comments.

see: http://php.net/manual/en/function.strpos.php

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1  
... which is why the standard practice is to check whether strpos(...) === FALSE. See the big warning on the man page: php.net/manual/en/function.strpos.php –  grossvogel May 23 '11 at 15:26
1  
Correct explanation, but it's better to strictly check if itis' not false (!== false) –  Evert May 23 '11 at 15:26
1  
strpos($string,$search)>=0 does not work as expected, because (false >= 0) === true. –  KingCrunch May 23 '11 at 15:27
    
You are of course correct - you really should check !== FALSE ! –  Ryan May 23 '11 at 15:27

This is happening because the search string is being found at position 0. Try

if(strpos($string,$search) !== FALSE)

instead of

if(strpos($string,$search))

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(1 != false) === true. In fact ($x != false) === ($x == true) === ((boolean) $x) for every $x. Thus both code snippets are identical. –  KingCrunch May 23 '11 at 15:31
    
@KingCrunch: so would if(strpos($string,$search) !== FALSE) be correct? –  Ozair Kafray May 24 '11 at 8:49
    
@OzairKafray it worked for me using !== false, it doesn't if I use != false –  user1301428 Feb 24 at 13:12
    
@user1301428: This was to highlight the difference between ===/!== and ==/!=, different things would work in different situations. To be sure what to use one should read the documentation for a function carefully and then assess his/her situation. –  Ozair Kafray Feb 25 at 5:30
1  
@OzairKafray if I understand it correctly, when the needle is found at the beginning of the haystack, then !== should always be used, but I might be wrong –  user1301428 Feb 25 at 12:04

From the manual:

This function may return Boolean FALSE, but may also return a non-Boolean value which evaluates to FALSE, such as 0 or "". Please read the section on Booleans for more information. Use the === operator for testing the return value of this function.

In your example, you should use

$string = "123";
$search = "123";

if ( false !== strpos( $string, $search ) ) {
    echo "found";
} else {
    echo "not found";
}
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You can use this:

<?php

$string = "123";

$find = "123";

$strpos = strpos($string, $find);

if($strpos || $strpos === (int)0) {
    echo "Found it!";
} else {
    echo "Not Found!";
}

?>
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Well documented issue explained here. strpos is simply returning '0'

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strpos returns the numeric position of the string you want to search for if it finds it. So in your case, you want to be doing this instead:

$search = "123";
$string = "123";
if (strpos($string,$search)===false) { echo "not found"; }
else { echo "found"; }

basically it returns a false if it doesn't find your string

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The answer Adam Moss gave can be seen explained more in depth on my blog. I came accross this issue before and used typecasting to solve it.

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