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What is the means, benefit and differences between User Agent detection and Feature Detection? and which one is better?

And please give usages examples for both.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The main reason to use feature detection as opposed to user agent sniffing is future proofing.

Let's say, for example, that you want to use some new XMLHttpRequest 2.0 features (just making this up). You know IE doesn't support it but Firefox does, and so you have code like this in your JS:

if (!IE) {
    UseNewAjax();
} else {
    UseOldAjax();
}

Later, a new version of IE comes out which supports the new features, but because you are agent-sniffing, your IE viewers can't get this feature goodness without you making a change to your code.

On the other hand, if you feature detection:

if (document.hasCoolNewAjax) {
    UseNewAjax();
} else {
    UseOldAjax();
}

You can be assured in the future that if a browser supports a feature they didn't before, they can start using these features immediately, and you don't have to change your code to support it.

Browser / User Agent sniffing: Using a programming language to determine what browser a visitor is using, so special logic can be written against that browser. Inefficient and considered a bad practice in the development community.

Feature detection: Using a programming language to determine whether a browser supports a particular feature. Considered a best practice in the developer community because it is fool-proof and future-proof.

From Wikipedia:

User agent sniffing is mostly considered poor practice, since it encourages browser-specific design and penalizes new browsers with unrecognized user agent identifications. Instead, the W3C recommends creating HTML markup that is standard,[citation needed] allowing correct rendering in as many browsers as possible, and to test for specific browser features rather than particular browser versions or brands.

JavaScript isn't the only language which you can user-agent sniff or feature detect from. For example, the .NET framework has properties that let you read all sorts of information about the browser:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3yekbd5b.aspx

http://modernizr.com

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Eli - Could you please explain both terms in simple way? –  Jitendra Vyas May 23 '11 at 16:34
1  
Especially in the case of IE, wouldn't user agent detection encompass version detection as well? If so, wouldn't it be fair to say that features are not going to change within the same version of a browser? –  Wesley Murch May 23 '11 at 16:34
    
It's a possibility, but why take the chance when you could code it once one way and have it always work? –  Eli May 23 '11 at 16:36
    
@Eli -What do you mean using code? –  Jitendra Vyas May 23 '11 at 16:41
1  
I haven't looked into that too much, but here is something interesting: tripleodeon.com/2010/10/modernizr-on-the-server-side –  Eli May 23 '11 at 16:50

Feature detection is always better than user agent detection because users can spoof their user agent string, so it's unreliable.

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users can spoof their user agent string could you explain this, please? –  Jitendra Vyas May 23 '11 at 16:24
1  
but user agent switcher is for developers not for general users –  Jitendra Vyas May 23 '11 at 16:27
2  
Some users switch their user agent because a site expects them to use a certain browser even though they know their browser will work with the site. Also your argument doesn't make user agent detection any more reliable. –  onteria_ May 23 '11 at 16:29
2  
@Wesley There seperate issues. All 3 are bad practices (UA sniffing, not supporting non-JS, and not protecting againts SQL injection). There all bad for the same reasons –  Raynos May 23 '11 at 16:38
2  
@JitendraVyas ;_; server side UA detection is the devil. Don't send different content to your client based on who you think he is. Send what was asked. –  Raynos May 23 '11 at 17:25

Aside from the other very good reasons given by the other answers, here's some psuedo code to give a different kind of example:

 if (new_feature_available)
 {
    use_new_feature();
 }
 else
 {
    use_old_feature();
 }

VS:

// We had to look up what features are available in each to make this list
// There are probably browsers we're missing here as well...
// TODO: Make this list really big and include all known browsers
// TODO: Double check that this feature is not supported in listed browsers

 if (
         browser not IE5, IE6, IE7, Opera8, Firefox1.8, Seamonkey,
         OR browser is Chrome10, Firefox4, IE9
     )
 {
    use_new_feature();
 }
 else
 {
    use_old_feature();
 }

Seeing this, doesn't feature detection make more sense?

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but I thought Feature detection will make the code heavy because all code will be in same file for old and new feature, while in UA detection we can keep content in separate files and deliver to specific browsers. –  Jitendra Vyas May 23 '11 at 16:52
    
@JitendraVyas: It depends, your question is very generalized. This (feature detection) is basically what jQuery does for many features. api.jquery.com/jQuery.support –  Wesley Murch May 23 '11 at 16:58

Browser sniffing is unreliable and hard to maintain.

It's unreliable because:

  • user agent spoofing can turn an iPad into a desktop PC running IE6 and vice-versa
  • the coupling between user agent version/OS version/JS engine version is very low if not completely non-existing

It's hard to maintain because:

  • user agents evolve all the time forcing you to fork and fork and fork
  • your code is tightly coupled to specific browsers/engine forcing many compromises and workarounds
  • your code is mostly based on assumptions and thus is very fragile

Feature detection makes for simpler and cleaner code. Said code is -in a way - abstracted from the browsers and almost totally future-proof.

share|improve this answer
    
but I thought Feature detection will make the code heavy because all code will be in same file for old and new feature, while in UA detection we can keep content in separate files and deliver to specific browsers. –  Jitendra Vyas May 23 '11 at 16:58
    
@Vyas To the best of my knowledge, the only (client-side) way to specify different files for different browsers is to use conditional comments, and that works only for Internet Explorer. In any case, the desire to avoid "heavy code" is no excuse for sloppy code, and user-agent detection is sloppy. –  DavidJCobb May 23 '11 at 17:49
    
@Vyas - Feature detection makes your code heavy if your project relies heavily on the latest features available in the latest breed of JS engine and you want to make it backward compatible. With such a strategy your project WILL fall apart and be a nightmare to maintain. If you use mostly regular stuff you'll have feature detection in only a few generalised places like an event manager and an ajax method or something. Your code will be clean, efficient and future proof. It doesn't matter at all to have it in one single file. –  romainl May 23 '11 at 18:08

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