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I tried solving the following problem in haskell:

Find the smallest number b with (a^b mod 100) = 1 for every a with gcd(a,100)=1

I tried this:

head[ b | a <- [1..], b <- [1..], (a^b `mod` 100) == 1, gcd a 100 == 1]

but this yields 1^1 as the first solution, which is not correct, it should be for every ; 3^1 is not a solution for example. I think the correct solution is b=20 but I want it in haskell.

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How do you plan to show this holds for every a with gcd(a,100)=1 with an exhaustive search to inifinity? –  pat May 23 '11 at 17:16
    
@pat: It is enough to check all a <= 0 < 100, because a ^ b mod 100 = ( a -100)^ b mod 100. –  FUZxxl May 23 '11 at 18:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Find the smallest number b

find f [1..]

with (a^b mod 100) = 1 for every a

f b = all (\a -> a^b `mod` 100 == 1) xs

[every a] with gcd(a,100)=1

    where xs = [a <- [1..100], gcd a 100 == 1]
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thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for –  spore234 May 23 '11 at 20:22
    
@spore234: Please identify that this answer is correct, if you know how. –  Tom May 23 '11 at 21:15
    
@spore234 if you like an answer, you can upvote it by clicking the up arrow. (I think that requires 15 reputation, which you now have). To accept an answer, you just click its check mark by the up/down arrows. –  Dan Burton May 23 '11 at 21:27

This seems to be a use of the Carmichael funktion λ(x). It calculates the smallest exponent m, such that am ≡ 1 mod x for all a such that gcd(a, x) = 1 holds. Because λ(100) = 20, the b you are looking for is 20.

You can calculate the solution for all modules (the x in the above formula) using the following untested Haskell expression, which is a more or less direct translation of the method explained in the Wikipedia article:

import Data.Numbers.Primes

carmichael 1 = 1
carmichael 2 = 1
carmichael 4 = 2
carmichael n | isPowerOf 2 n    = n `div` 4
             | isPowerOf fac1 n = (n `div` fac1) * (fac1 - 1)
             | otherwise        = foldr1 lcm $ map (carmichael . product) grp
  where factors@(fac1:_) = primeFactors n
        grp              = group factors

isPowerOf n k | n == k         = True
              | k `mod` n == 0 = isPowerOf n (k `div` n)
              | otherwise      = False
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2  
+1: Carmichael function is right... –  Aryabhatta May 23 '11 at 17:41
    
@Aryabhatta: Just learned about it on mathematics.se –  FUZxxl May 23 '11 at 18:38
    
@Fuz: Yeah, I have seen you there :-) –  Aryabhatta May 23 '11 at 18:43
    
The isPowerOf function either has the wrong name of the wrong implementation. It does not test if k is a power of n. –  augustss May 23 '11 at 19:09
1  
Data.Number.Primes? cool! never knew about that module –  jon_darkstar May 24 '11 at 14:05

The "for every a" part is an infinite set, so you shouldn't expect to solve this problem with a direct brute force solution. You need more number theory here.


Anyway, assuming a direct solution is possible, the problem here is that the a <- [...], b <- [...] is just finding all pairs of a and b values, willy nilly. You need to put some ordering in to get what you want:

bs = [b | b <- [1..],
         (and [(a `mod` b)==1 | a <- [1..])
     ]

Where the and function returns whether all elements in the list are true. (Still doesn't work, since the a <- [1..] is infinite, meaning the and either returns False or loops forever).

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I'd write the second line (all (==1) [mod a b | a <- [1..]]). Also, you could just restrict a to [1..100] if you only want to solve this particular problem. –  Dan Burton May 23 '11 at 19:16

To my knowledge, list comprehensions iterate each bound variable in reverse order of appearance:

[ (x,y) | x <- [0,1], y <- [0,1] ] == [(0,0),(0,1),(1,0),(1,1)]
[ (x,y) | x <- [0,1], y <- [0..] ] == [(0,0),(0,1),(0,2),(0,3),(0,4),(0,5),...]
[ (x,y) | x <- [0..], y <- [0,1] ] == [(0,0),(0,1),(1,0),(1,1),(2,0),(2,1),...]

In the case of infinite lists, one can run into problems this way. The second example above shows how one variable in an infinite list will prevent another from ever changing, but the third shows that changing the order fixes this.

To demonstrate how your current list comprehension iterates through a and b:

[ (a,b) | a <- [1..], b <- [1..] ] == [(1,1),(1,2),(1,3),(1,4),(1,5),(1,6),...]

This problem is similar to that of the second example. I don't know enough number theory to help you further with an efficient solution, but this is the fundamental problem with your implementation.

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