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I will have two files. One header.h file and second one is main.c file.

Now, how to make a header.h file with methods written in C (such as print test etc), then in main.c file, how can I access them with operators such as :: or ->

@file: main.c

#include "header.h"; // sorry i made mistake before

int main()
    {
      A::myStaticFunction();

      // OR

      A->myInstanceFunction();

      return 0;
    }
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7  
Where did you get the import from? What is .A supposed to mean? Is this C or C++? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 23 '11 at 17:10
    
is it C++ CLI i.e. managed C++ by any chance? –  Asha May 23 '11 at 17:17
2  
@Asha: I think :: is only possible with C++. But C++ is very hard, i want to do only :: and -> with C. –  YumYumYum May 23 '11 at 17:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would like to do it completely in C.
(from @Sonia's comment on @Als' answer)

Not completely possible. What you got there is C++ code, it can't be emulated in C in exactly that way.

In C, a struct can't have functions, only function pointer and also can't have any static members at all. So, no :: for you in that regard. Your other example, on @David's answer, is most likely an enum:

typedef enum _H323Connection{
  AnswerCallNow,
  AnswerCallLater,
  IgnoreCall,
  /* examples */
}H323Connection;

Now, to get one of those values inside the enum you can just use the name (IgnoreCall) or qualify it with the enum's name (H323Connection::IgnoreCall).

The -> operator, however, is totally possible.

typedef struct _sA{
  // function pointer
  void (*AnswerCall)(struct _sA*, H323Connection);
  // variables...
}sA;

void sA_AnswerCall(sA* self, H323Connection callmode){
  // do something with self
  switch(callmode){
    case AnswerCallNow: /* ... */ break;
    case AnswerCallLater: /* ... */ break;
    case IgnoreCall: /* ... */ break;
  }
}

int main(){
  sA* pA = (sA*)malloc(sizeof(sA));

  // assign function pointer;
  pA->AnswerCall = sA_AnswerCall;
  // call it and pass "this" (the object the function operates on)
  pA->AnswerCall(pA, H323Connection::AnswerCallNow);
  // in C++ ---- ^^ would be the "this" pointer and 
  // would be passed secretly by the compiler

  free(pA);
}
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2  
excellent you really know what you are doing. I appreciate it. But i dont get it yet do you mean :: i can only use in C++? Not in ANSI-C or Objective-C? –  YumYumYum May 23 '11 at 17:37
2  
@Sonia: As other answers explain, it is the scope resolution operator. In C, there are not many scopes. But you just gave me an idea to solve this static function problem. Brb. :) –  Xeo May 23 '11 at 17:45
2  
@Sonia: Nope, my experiment failed, you can't have static members in C and as such no static member functions (not even emulated with static function pointers). –  Xeo May 23 '11 at 17:48
2  
Thanks for your guide, you are brilliant programmer. I hope there is no :: in C. Just to make my confusion clear, how is that possible in PHP programming language which is written by C language. And with Zend Framework you can do 3 in 1? ex: 1) Zend_Debug::dump( Application_MVC_Class::loadMethod("works") ); or 2) $a->test(); or 3) $a.test1(); –  YumYumYum May 23 '11 at 18:03
    
PHP is an interpreter written in C, but PHP-syntax itself is not dependent on C's language features. The interpreter reads a line from the PHP file, translates that code into a C data-structure, and then executes the desired operation. Scope-resolution and other "non-C" features are nothing more than data-structures like hash-tables, linked-lists, etc., all of which can be implemented using structures that have void* data-members pointing to allocated PHP objects on the heap, and labels (i.e., enums, etc.) in order to properly interpret the PHP objects being pointed to by the void*'s. –  Jason May 23 '11 at 20:47

If your question is about the -> and :: operators, they are used in different ways.

First is the :: operator, it is used in two ways

  1. Namespace clarification. The :: operator is used to specify something within a namespace without having the using keyword. For example, if you were using the STL version of the vector<T> class, you can access it directly by using std::vector<T>
  2. Static class member access. If you have static members declared for a class (functions or variables) they are accessed via ClassName::memberName.

Secondly, the -> operator is the same as the . operator, except it is used for pointer objects. Example

struct myStruct {
    int x,y;
};

int main(void)
{
    myStruct aStaticVersion;
    aStaticVersion.x = 0;
    myStruct *aPointerVersion = new myStruct();
    aPointerVersion->x = 0; //Acts the same as aStaticVersion.x = 0;
    return 0;
}

EDIT:

As Xeo has reminded me, the :: operator has a third usage, to specify members of an enum EX:

enum myEnum {
  firstValue = 0,
  secondValue,
  thirdValue
};

int main(void)
{
   myEnum enumValue = myEnum::secondValue;
   return 0;
}
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You should start with a C tutorial, as this is very basic, and for sure explained in all tutorials.

// header.h
#ifndef HEADER_H
#define HEADER_H
void foo();
#endif

// main.c
#include "header.h"
int main() {
   foo();
}

With foo being defined in a different .c file that gets linked together.

Now it seems, from the code, that you are not talking about C, but rather C++, and that you have a class defined in the header:

// header.h
#ifndef HEADER_H
#define HEADER_H
struct A {
   static void foo();
   void bar();
};
#endif

// main.c
#include "header.h"
int main() {
   A::foo();        // static method
   A a;
   a.bar();         // non-static method
}

Again, the methods defined in a .cpp file and linked together.

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1  
Hello David, thank you. I think i explained wrong. I am reading a code where its using such things so i wanted to make a small test first how it works example: connection->AnsweringCall(H323Connection::AnswerCallNow); Where i dont see in what is that -> and :: is doing? –  YumYumYum May 23 '11 at 17:13
    
@Sonia - How the method signature of AnsweringCall looks like ? –  Mahesh May 23 '11 at 17:33

A::myStaticFunction();` is possible if myStaticFunction() is a static function in class A.

A->myInstanceFunction(); is not possible you need to create a pointer of class A to call its member function in this fashion.

// header.h

#ifndef HEADER_H
#define HEADER_H
class A
{
    public:
    static void myStaticFunction()
    {
         //do some stuff
    }

    void myInstanceFunction()
    {

    }
};

void doSomething()
{

}
#endif

//main.cpp

int main()
{
    //Call static function inside a class, no need of class instance or pointer
    A::myStaticFunction();

    //Call member function inside a class, need a class instance or pointer
    A *ptr = new A();
    ptr->myInstanceFunction();
    //or
    A obj;
    obj.myInstanceFunction()

    //call a global function outside the class, no need of class instance or pointer
    doSomething();

    return 1;
}
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1  
"@file: main.c" - so, no C++ stuff, including classes. –  Xeo May 23 '11 at 17:16
2  
@xeo: Q is tagged C++, besides how are you going to use -> or :: without C++? –  Alok Save May 23 '11 at 17:17
2  
Thank you. Yes Xeo is correct. I would like to do it completely in C. But anyway thank you so much, its very nice example you wrote in 30 seconds? You must be brilliant. –  YumYumYum May 23 '11 at 17:19
1  
Nevermind my last comment, but both -> and :: are possible in C. –  Xeo May 23 '11 at 17:20

The :: is the scope resolution operator ... you use it to create qualified names from a scope/namespace in C++ using a syntax like namespace::variable_name. For instance, if you had

int a_var;

namespace nested
{
    int a_var;
}

then in order to access the fully qualified name of the two different versions of a_var, you'd have ::a_var (meaning that it's in the global scope), and nested::a_var. If you were to try and call a variable named a_var, C++ would default to the current scope first. If you wanted to get another version of a_var in a different namespace, you would have to qualify that name. Here is an example using two functions that you might define after the above code:

void func_a()
{
    a_var = 5; //<== accesses ::a_var in the global namespace
}

void func_b()
{
    nested::a_var = 5; <== accesses nested::a_var and not ::a_var
}

So you can see just assigning a value 5 to a_var does not get you the version of a_var in the nested namespace. If you want that alternate version of a_var, you'll have to qualify the name using the scope resolution operator.

Scope resolution also applies to classes and structs ... both of those types of objects create a namespace scope for their static data-members and functions as well, so if you had declared some object class Foo, and you wanted access to some static data member int b_var, you could gain access to it by writing the fully qualified name Foo::b_var.

The -> operator is a pointer dereference operator for compound types (i.e., classes and structs). I works the same way it does in traditional C, where if you had a pointer to an object of some type T, then T->method_function() or T->non_static_variable would dereference the pointer of type T* and access the appropriate non-static member function or non-static data variable. It's basically the same as writing (*T).method_function() or (*T).non_static_variable.

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In C and derivates you include header files with the #include pre-processor directive. This does nothing else than interpreting the included file. It is the same effect as if you copy-n-pasted the content of the header file into your source code. You cannot access header files or parts of it by name like for example in python.

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1  
Hello Hyperbereus, Thank you, i am very sorry i really forgot it, it was my java lesson making me confused. –  YumYumYum May 23 '11 at 17:20

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