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I am trying to generate a random password in php.

However I am getting all 'a's and the return type is of type array and I would like it to be a string. Any ideas on how to correct the code?

Thanks.

function randomPassword() {
    $alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUWXYZ0123456789";
    for ($i = 0; $i < 8; $i++) {
        $n = rand(0, count($alphabet)-1);
        $pass[$i] = $alphabet[$n];
    }
    return $pass;
}
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marked as duplicate by Ja͢ck, Alma Do, Jonjongot, Oscar, Touki Apr 3 at 9:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You have count(alphabet); vs count($alphabet); –  Explosion Pills May 23 '11 at 19:30
    
if you displayed errors (notices, warnings, etc) to screen while debugging, you would have immediately spotted the error. See error_reporting and display_errors. –  Matthew May 23 '11 at 19:32
    
The count of a string is always 1! I think you are getting Strings and arrays mixed up. Consider using the str_split function or manually code in an array instead of the string. –  Programster Oct 5 '13 at 12:15

14 Answers 14

up vote 113 down vote accepted

Try this (use strlen instead of count, because count on a string is always 1):

function randomPassword() {
    $alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUWXYZ0123456789";
    $pass = array(); //remember to declare $pass as an array
    $alphaLength = strlen($alphabet) - 1; //put the length -1 in cache
    for ($i = 0; $i < 8; $i++) {
        $n = rand(0, $alphaLength);
        $pass[] = $alphabet[$n];
    }
    return implode($pass); //turn the array into a string
}

Demo: http://codepad.org/UL8k4aYK

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9  
Seems more straightforward to use $pass .= $alphabet[$n]. –  Matthew May 23 '11 at 19:33
    
@konforce, yes true, but i just went with the array way the op had, there is nothing really wrong with it. –  Neal May 23 '11 at 19:34
1  
there's no point of using [$i] thought, [] would've been enough. –  Karl Laurentius Roos May 23 '11 at 19:37
4  
Generating password using rand is a really bad idea. It's not a secure PRNG. (and no mt_rand isn't better either) –  CodesInChaos Oct 31 '13 at 16:56
3  
The question is about generating a password. Code to generate a password clearly needs to use secure random numbers. –  CodesInChaos Oct 31 '13 at 17:18

Tiny code with 2 line.

demo: http://codepad.org/5rHMHwnH

function rand_string( $length ) {

    $chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789";
    return substr(str_shuffle($chars),0,$length);

}

echo rand_string(8);

with rand_string you can define how much character will be create.

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11  
Nice, though you won't get any repeated characters using this approach, which might be undesirable. –  Hobo Dec 15 '12 at 10:47
4  
This function is terrible for generating long passwords. First, if $length is longer than the $chars string, then you will not receive a string as long as the length you input, but the length of the chars string. Also, you are guaranteed only 1 of each character with no duplicates. It also does not guarantee the use of a capital letter or a number which is quite often a requirement (except of course if your length is more than 26 due to the previous fault) –  Programster Oct 5 '13 at 11:59

In one line:

substr(str_shuffle('abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789') , 0 , 10 )
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2  
+1 for shortest Answer –  Steel Brain May 28 at 20:03
function generate_password($length = 20){
  $chars =  'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'.
            '0123456789``-=~!@#$%^&*()_+,./<>?;:[]{}\|';

  $str = '';
  $max = strlen($chars) - 1;

  for ($i=0; $i < $length; $i++)
    $str .= $chars[mt_rand(0, $max)];

  return $str;
}
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3  
don't use mt_rand to generate a password. –  CodesInChaos Oct 31 '13 at 17:00
    
@CodesInChaos it's better than rand() which is what the above example uses. openssl_random_pseudo_bytes() is preferred according to the PHP manual. –  willbradley Dec 20 at 21:58

\base_convert(\uniqid('pass', true), 10, 36);

eg. e0m6ngefmj4

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PS - this is PHP - just using \ to denote the global namespace. –  Bob Gregor Apr 24 '13 at 1:33
    
Except that uniqid is not cryptographically secure. Use rand() instead: base_convert(rand(78364164096, 2821109907455), 10, 36); –  Benubird Feb 20 at 12:51
    
@Benubird rand() is not cryptographically secure either, according to the PHP manual. The manual suggests openssl_random_pseudo_bytes() instead. –  willbradley Dec 20 at 21:58

You want strlen($alphabet), not count of the constant alphabet (equivalent to 'alphabet').

However, rand is not a suitable random function for this purpose. Its output can easily be predicted as it is implicitly seeded with the current time. Additionally, rand is not cryptographically secure; it is therefore relatively easy to determine its internal state from output.

Instead, read from /dev/urandom to get cryptographically random data.

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I know you are trying to generate your password in a specific way, but you might want to look at this method as well...

$bytes = openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(2);

$pwd = bin2hex($bytes);

It's taken from the php.net site and it creates a string which is twice the length of the number you put in the openssl_random_pseudo_bytes function. So the above would create a password 4 characters long.

In short...

$pwd = bin2hex(openssl_random_pseudo_bytes(4));

Would create a password 8 characters long.

Note however that the password only contains numbers 0-9 and small cap letters a-f!

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If you want a password that's uppercase, lowercase, and numbers, try this: gist.github.com/zyphlar/7217f566fc83a9633959 –  willbradley Dec 20 at 22:35

This is basically the same as the much simpler substr(md5(uniqid()), 0, 8);

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5  
Except it's more secure against brute force attacks, because MD5 only uses lowercase A-F and 0-9. If an attacker knew you were using this, they could narrow their brute-force search considerably, as there are only 4.2 billion possible 8-character passwords. Using all letters (upper and lower) as well as digits gives 218,340 billion combinations. –  Malvineous Nov 8 '12 at 10:12
2  
@Malvineous But only when generated by a proper PRNG. I believe the seeding of rand and mt_rand is so bad that the effective entropy is even smaller that 32 bits. –  CodesInChaos Oct 31 '13 at 17:20

Another one (linux only)

function randompassword()
{
    $fp = fopen ("/dev/urandom", 'r');
    if (!$fp) { die ("Can't access /dev/urandom to get random data. Aborting."); }
    $random = fread ($fp, 1024); # 1024 bytes should be enough
    fclose ($fp);
    return trim (base64_encode ( md5 ($random, true)), "=");
}
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i had a requirement that the password passed validation -- 8 chars, 1 lower case, 1 uppercase, 1 number. i liked the idea that a computer random device could be used, so i got the 1024 bytes, and sliced it randomly. This is for a random password generator where the password has to be changed by the user after using it.

so i merged a method from @Neal, and @Askarel to come up with this:

function random_password( $length = 12 ) //http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6101956/generating-a-random-password-in-php
{
    $password = '';
    $length =  max($length,8); // makes sure length can't be too short an cause an infinite loop.

    while( preg_match( '/(?=^.{8,}$)((?=.*\d)|(?=.*\W+))(?![.\n])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[a-z]).*$')/' , $password ) === 0 )
    {
        $fp = fopen ("/dev/urandom", 'r');
        if ($fp)
        {
            $random = fread ($fp, 1024); # 1024 bytes should be enough
            fclose ($fp);
            $password =  substr(trim (base64_encode ( $random), "="),rand(0,1024-$length),$length);
        }  
        else
        {
            $alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUWXYZ0123456789!@#$%^&*()_+-=";
            $pass = array(); //remember to declare $pass as an array
            $alphaLength = strlen($alphabet) - 1; //put the length -1 in cache
            for ($i = 0; $i < $length; $i++)
            {
                $n = rand(0, $alphaLength);
                $pass[] = $alphabet[$n];
            }
            $password = implode($pass); //turn the array into a string
        }
    }

    return $password;
}
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1  
You're still using rand, so fundamentally this is wrong, if you want a secure password. –  George Lund Nov 4 '13 at 10:54
    
so what is better than a stream from /dev/urandom? if it can't make a random number what is its point? the other code is only there as a fall back. and, this is for a temporary password that is changed anyway –  pgee70 Nov 5 '13 at 8:40
    
I guess I'm arguing that it's better to throw an exception than to implement an insecure fall-back. Really, one-time URLs or similar are much better solution than a temporary password - security.stackexchange.com/questions/17979/… has a fairly in-depth discussion. –  George Lund Nov 5 '13 at 12:37

Do we need to go fancy? Forget about arrays - strings will suffice.

function randomPassword() {
    $alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUWXYZ0123456789";
    $pass = '';                           //password is a string
    $alphaLength = strlen($alphabet) - 1; //put the length -1 in cache
    for ($i = 0; $i < 8; $i++) {
        $n = mt_rand(0, $alphaLength);    
        $pass = $pass.$alphabet[$n];      //append a random character
    }
    return ($pass); 
}

Also mt_rand() is automatically seeded so it is less predictable than rand().

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don't use mt_rand to generate a password. –  CodesInChaos Oct 31 '13 at 17:02
    
@CodesInChaos why? –  Aakil Fernandes Dec 4 '13 at 2:17
1  
@AakilFernandes Because it isn't a cryptographically secure PRNG and it's seeded with a small and predictable seed. –  CodesInChaos Dec 4 '13 at 8:21

This simple function takes a range of characters and returns a random length string - reusing characters from the defined set for extra entropy...:

function generate_key() {

   // define characters ##
   $chars =  'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789``-=~!@#$%^&*()_+,./<>?;:[]{}\|';

   // declare our return variable ##
   $key = '';

   // loop over the character set a randomly defined number of times ##
   for( $i = 0; $i < mt_rand( 15, 50 ); $i++ ) {

       $key .= $chars[ mt_rand( 0, strlen( $chars )-1) ];

   }

   // kick it back ##
   return $key;

}
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To generate password of 8 digit length

function getRandomPassword()
{
    $acceptablePasswordChars ="abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ_.$@#&0123456789";
    $randomPassword = "";

    for($i = 0; $i < 8; $i++)
    {
        $randomPassword .= substr($acceptablePasswordChars, rand(0, strlen($acceptablePasswordChars) - 1), 1);  
    }
    return $randomPassword; 
}
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Generate Random Password in PHP of 15 Characters

<?php 
$digit = rand (1,4);
$digit2 = rand (5,9);
$s = substr(str_shuffle(str_repeat("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz", 5)), 0, 5);
$t = substr(str_shuffle(str_repeat("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz", 3)), 0, 3);
$q = substr(str_shuffle(str_repeat("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ", 4)), 0, 4);
$z = substr(str_shuffle(str_repeat("~!@#$%^&*()_+-={}|[]\:;<>?,./", 1)), 0, 1);

$password=$digit.$s.$z.$q.$digit2.$t;

echo $password;

?>
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