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Say I have this Ruby code in test.rb

module MyModule
  class TestClassA
  end

  class TestClassB
    def initialize
      a = Object.const_get('MyModule::TestClassA').new
    end
  end
end

Here some tests in a ruby shell started with irb -r test.rb:

ruby-1.8.7-p302 > MyModule
 => MyModule 
ruby-1.8.7-p302 > MyModule::TestClassA
 => MyModule::TestClassA 
ruby-1.8.7-p302 > MyModule::TestClassA.new
 => #<MyModule::TestClassA:0x10036bef0> 
ruby-1.8.7-p302 > MyModule::TestClassB
 => MyModule::TestClassB 
ruby-1.8.7-p302 > MyModule::TestClassB.new
NameError: wrong constant name MyModule::TestClassA
    from ./test.rb:7:in `const_get'
    from ./test.rb:7:in `initialize'
    from (irb):1:in `new'
    from (irb):1

Why does Object.const_get('MyModule::TestClassA').new in the constructor of TestClassB fail while MyModule::TestClassA.new works in the console? I also tried Object.const_get('TestClassA').new, but that doesn't work either.

share|improve this question
up vote 16 down vote accepted

There is no constant named "MyModule::TestClassA", there's a constant named TestClassA inside a constant named MyModule.

Try:

module MyModule
  class TestClassA
  end

  class TestClassB
    def initialize
      a = Object.const_get("MyModule").const_get("TestClassA").new
    end
  end
end

As to why it doesn't work, it's because :: is an operator and not a naming convention.

Additional examples and information is available at http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/182803

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this very useful explanation. One question: Why did you change your answer from using a symbol in const_get vs. now a string? Does that make any difference? Thanks! – StefanS May 23 '11 at 20:22
1  
No it doesn't, but I figured that since your question was "... via string" i'd better use a string rather than a symbol :-) – Simon Stender Boisen May 23 '11 at 20:27
1  
For arbitrarily nested class/module constructs, this 1-liner works fine: class_name.split(‘::’).inject(Kernel) {|scope, const_name| scope.const_get(const_name)} – Marc Seeger Sep 5 '13 at 16:29
    
why not? for me MyModule::TestClassA works well. – アレックス Apr 3 '14 at 13:30
1  
@Alex -- that works fine in Ruby 2.0.0 and higher, but older versions will yield a wrong constant name: MyModule::TestClassA error. The answer above allows for greater backwards compatibility. – ABach Apr 26 '14 at 19:41

In Ruby 2.0+, this works fine:

#! /usr/bin/env ruby

module Foo
  class Bar
    def initialize(baz)
      @baz = baz
    end

    def qux
      puts "quux: #{@baz}"
    end
  end
end

Kernel.const_get("Foo::Bar").new('corge').qux

Results:

bash-3.2$ ./test.rb
quux: corge
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