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I want to implement a remember me option for the login

therefore I want to store both username and hashed password to a cookie, and check it when the user come back to the site.

I tried to do

cookies[:user] = { :value => {:username => @user.username, :password =>
@user.hashed_password}, :expires => 1.month.from_now }

it's save the cookie, but I can't read its attributes

cookies[:user].username # doesn't work

by the way, is it the best solution to implement RememberMe?

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Why won't you use devise gem? –  Roman May 23 '11 at 20:03
2  
I'm building my first app with rails, and I want better understanding of what happens under the hood. –  gilsilas May 23 '11 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Maybe this answer can help you

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1  
This answers his problem creating a "remember me" function, but it does not answer the question as stated: "how to store hash value in cookie with rails 3". –  MikeJ Jun 24 '13 at 17:35

Better to use the session method for setting these sorts of things. Feel free to keep the session in a cookie by using the default :cookie_store setting in config/initializers/session_store.rb.

session[:user] = { :foo => { :bar => 'woot' } }

Then later...

session[:user][:foo][:bar] # => 'woot'
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how can I change the session expiration? When the session based on cookie I think that the user can just change the user_id and logged in as other user, am I right? –  gilsilas May 23 '11 at 20:57
    
Yes, if you used something simple like the user_id then it will be trivial to hack. That's why few people use the :cookie_store –  smathy May 23 '11 at 21:30

From what I have read, one can only store strings in cookies. In order to store other data structures one need to serialize the data, such as JSON or YAML.

And I guess Session object has this built-in

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2  
Using new-style hash syntax for brevity: cookies[:user] = { value: { username: @user.username, password: @user.hashed_password }.to_json, expires: 1.month.from_now } then later use: foo = JSON.parse(cookies[:user]). foo will now be a Hash, but with keys all converted to strings, so you may want to use: foo = JSON.parse(cookies[:user]).with_indifferent_access. Then foo[:username] won't be nil. –  MikeJ Jun 24 '13 at 17:44
    
@MikeJ Your comment should be an answer (and accepted), as it is concise and has a concrete example. –  thekingoftruth Jan 15 at 19:16

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