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In light of the answers to the original question I had, I have amended my code. I was hoping if someone could tell me if this is a better approach in comparison. My original post and code is below.

UPDATED CODE

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Language" content="en-us" />

    <meta name="keywords" content="" />
    <meta name="description" content="" />
    <meta name="author" content= "" />

    <title>Example</title>

    <base href="" />

    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="" />

    <style type="text/css">

        * {

            margin: 0;
            padding: 0;

        }

        #wrapper {


        }

        #header {

            background-image: url('images/bg-inner-page.gif');
            height: 200px;

        }

        #logo {

            float: left;
            margin-top:  50px;
            margin-left: 100px;

        }

        #topnav {

            float: right;
            margin-top: 50px;
            margin-right: 1250px;

        }

        #topnav ul {

            word-spacing: 10px;

        }


        #topnav ul li {

            list-style-type: none;
            display: inline;

        }

        #content {

            background-color: orange;

        }

        #footer {

            background-color: blue;

        }

    </style>
</head>

<body>

    <div id="wrapper">
        <div id="header">

            <div id="logo">
                logo
            </div>

            <div id="topnav">
                <ul>
                    <li>home</li>
                    <li>about</li>
                    <li>browse</li>
                    <li>faq</li>
                    <li>contact</li>
                </ul>
            </div>


        </div>
        <div id="content">content</div>
        <div id="footer">footer</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

ORIGINAL POST

I am new to the world of coding as well as CSS. I am attempting to line up CSS elements however unaware how I can place some sort of lines to get the exact line-height, position, etc. I attempted to use FireBug however to no avail. Is there some of tool I can use that possible places a grid over the canvas?

EDIT

Here is a sample of the code I am working with.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Language" content="en-us" />

    <meta name="keywords" content="" />
    <meta name="description" content="" />
    <meta name="author" content= "" />

    <title>Example</title>

    <base href="" />

    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="" />

    <style type="text/css">

    body {

        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;

    }

    #wrapper {


    }

    #header {

        background-image: url('images/bg-inner-page.gif');
        height: 200px;

    }

    #logo {

        width: 20px;
        position: relative;
        top: 50px;
        left: 100px;

    }

    #topnav {

        width: 500px;
        position: relative;
        top: 14px;
        left: 150px;

    }

    #topnav ul {

        word-spacing: 10px;

    }

    #topnav ul li {

        list-style-type: none;
        display: inline;
        word-spacing: 10px;

    }

    #content {

        background-color: orange;

    }

    #footer {

        background-color: blue;

    }

    </style>
</head>

<body>

    <div id="wrapper">
        <div id="header">

            <div id="logo">
                logo
            </div>

            <div id="topnav">
                <ul>
                    <li>home</li>
                    <li>about</li>
                    <li>browse</li>
                    <li>faq</li>
                    <li>contact</li>
                </ul>
            </div>

        </div>
        <div id="content">content</div>
        <div id="footer">footer</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
Not sure what are CSS elements unless you are referring to the HTML elements that links to the CSS for styling via classes or ID? –  robx May 23 '11 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is generally inadvisable to do pixel-by-pixel layout in webpages. You can never tell with which browser, which resolution on which platform and with which fonts installed your future customer will view the page.

Use HTML and CSS to specify a logical layout of the document. Tell the rendering machine, which parts have enphasis, which are less important and so on and let the renderer decide how to represent it the best way on the target display and UI-theme.

If you start worrying about pixel-exact line heights, your page most probebly will look swell on one browser, in one resolution on one platform and in the rest of the world like turd.

Move from physical mark-up to logical mark-up.

share|improve this answer
    
@Hyperboreus - I have updated my example with the sample code I am working with. I am attempting to have the logo and top navigation on the same line. I appreciate logical layout however how can I achieve the layout I wish to have without worrying about pixel-exact line-heights, spacing, etc –  PeanutsMonkey May 23 '11 at 20:18
    
Google the CSS "float" property, maybe this will help. –  Hyperboreus May 23 '11 at 20:20
    
@Hyperboreus - Thanks. I did try float however it doesn't allow me to position the navigation and logo as required unless I missing something. –  PeanutsMonkey May 23 '11 at 21:15
    
@Hyperboreus - I have updated my code and question. Can you please tell me if I going down the right path? –  PeanutsMonkey May 23 '11 at 22:08
    
Yes, this is the path. Per aspera ad astra. Play around with top, left, border, paddings, margins. Eventually on FF it will look the way you need it. Then you open it in IE and everything is screwed up. More adaptions. . . Welcome to the limbo of all web designers. –  Hyperboreus May 23 '11 at 22:46

The Web Developer Extension for firefox ( http://chrispederick.com/work/web-developer/ ) has a grid function.

Alternatively, in html/css, you can create an overlaying, full-screen div with a grid background to give you the visual, but its not the best solution since you'd also have to make it the highest z-index element, or make all other elements have a background of transparent, which could screw with your design.

Highly suggest just using the plug in, you don't want to mix in html/css just as a developer tool too much.

<subjective>Whilst I agree with the sentiment of "don't do pixel-level design", sometime the requirements of the project demand it. Using a reset css like YUI-reset is one of the better ways to have most browser renderings consistent, but also requires you have stye declarations for all the elements from the ground up. </subjective>

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Just downloaded the tool. Trying to get my head around using it. –  PeanutsMonkey May 23 '11 at 22:19

I agree with Hyperboreus above, trying to make the site exactly the same in all browsers is a recipe for a headache.

But, I've often used xscope (http://iconfactory.com/software/xscope) to overlay guidelines and grids on my mac to line things up. It's not free, but it's well worth the $25.

Edit: Just saw your code. If you're just trying to get the logo and nav on the same line, try something like this:

<title>Example</title>

<base href="" />

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="" />

<style type="text/css">
body {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

#header {
    background-image: url('images/bg-inner-page.gif');
    height: 200px;
}

#logo {
    width: 20px;
    float: left;
    margin-top: 50px;
    margin-left: 100px;
}

#topnav {

    width: 500px;
    margin-left: 150px;
    margin-top: 14px;

}

#topnav ul {

    word-spacing: 10px;

}

#topnav ul li {

    list-style-type: none;
    display: inline;
    word-spacing: 10px;

}

#content {

    background-color: orange;

}

#footer {

    background-color: blue;

}

</style>

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="header">

        <div id="logo">
            logo
        </div>

        <div id="topnav">
            <ul>
                <li>home</li>
                <li>about</li>
                <li>browse</li>
                <li>faq</li>
                <li>contact</li>
            </ul>
        </div>

    </div>
    <div id="content">content</div>
    <div id="footer">footer</div>
</div>

You can see it here: http://jsfiddle.net/BRKrx/

share|improve this answer
    
@John Sico - Thanks however that does position the navigation nor the logo in the manner I want. It simply floats to the top left of the screen. Can I have top, right, bottom, left positions for float? –  PeanutsMonkey May 23 '11 at 21:14
    
That speaks to what Hyperboreus mentions above. In order to move your items around using float, you'll want to adjust the margins, width and padding accordingly for each element. I'll adjust my answer to add something like what you're doing with positioning above. –  John Sico May 23 '11 at 21:21
    
@John Sico - Thanks. Doesn't quite give me what I am looking for but I see what you mean. However this confuses me further. When do use float and when do I use position? –  PeanutsMonkey May 23 '11 at 21:30
    
That's a difficult question to answer succinctly. In short, both floats and absolute positioning remove an element from the normal "flow" of your site. Anytime you do this, it makes things somewhat less flexible, which is a Bad Thing. Since a website is always at the mercy of the end users' browser, you'll want your site to behave in as many situations as possible - and using CSS that doesn't "force" a layout will go a long way in this regard. Google the "box model" and floats vs. positioning, and you'll find a ton of good info. –  John Sico May 23 '11 at 21:38
    
@John Sico - Thanks. I have had a look at the box model, float and positioning. Based on the information I have read, it is recommended that float be used for elements such as images or elements that require wrapping around it assuming you are not using clear: both;. I am not attempting to 'force' a layout on the end user however attempting to code in a manner that is supported by all browsers as much as possible. I'll give it another go and see how far I can get. –  PeanutsMonkey May 23 '11 at 21:41

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