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In templates, where and why do I have to put typename and template on dependent names? What exactly are dependent names anyway? I have the following code:

template <typename T, typename Tail> // Tail will be a UnionNode too.
struct UnionNode : public Tail {
    // ...
    template<typename U> struct inUnion {
        // Q: where to add typename/template here?
        typedef Tail::inUnion<U> dummy; 
    };
    template< > struct inUnion<T> {
    };
};
template <typename T> // For the last node Tn.
struct UnionNode<T, void> {
    // ...
    template<typename U> struct inUnion {
        char fail[ -sizeof(U) ]; // Cannot be instantiated for any U
    };
    template< > struct inUnion<T> {
    };
};

The problem I have is in the typedef Tail::inUnion<U> dummy line. I'm fairly certain that inUnion is a dependent name, and VC++ is quite right in choking on it. I also know that I should be able to add template somewhere to tell the compiler that inUnion is a template-id. But where exactly? And should it then assume that inUnion is a class template, i.e. inUnion<U> names a type and not a function?

Background:

I implemented a "discriminated union" capable of holding C++ types, even if they have destructors etc. I implemented this as a Russian doll; i.e. Union<T1, T2, T3> derives from UnionNode<T1, UnionNode<T2, UnionNode<T3, void> > > and UnionNode<T, Tail> derives from Tail. The specialization UnionNode<T, void> holds a void* which contains the actual data, and an index to store the current type.

For quite a few functions, I'd like a meta-function to determine if a type U is one of the types T1..Tn. For instance, I've got a member template<typename U> union_cast<U> that should only be instantiated for types that could actually be in the union. Trying to cast a Union<bool, float> to std::string is a compile-time error.

The simple solution was to add a template <typename U> struct inUnion. The idea is simple, I think: Each UnionNode<T, Tail> defines a template specialization inUnion<T>, and forwards the generic case inUnion<U>. If in the last node, no specialization of inUnion<U> has been found, then U is not one of the types T1...Tn, and I try to typedef an array with negative size.

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Annoying question: why not boost::Variant? –  Assaf Lavie Mar 4 '09 at 12:12
3  
Political sensitivities, portability. –  MSalters Mar 5 '09 at 10:34
3  
I made your actual question ("Where to put template/typename?") stand out better by putting the final question and code at the beginning and shortened the code horizontally to fit a 1024x screen. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 22 '10 at 10:10
    
Note that this using typename SomeBase<T>::type; does not work in GCC due to gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=14258. –  Justin L. Aug 26 '11 at 18:58
3  
Removed the "dependent names" from the title because it appears that most people who wonder about "typename" and "template" don't know what "dependent names" are. It should be less confusing to them this way. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 29 '11 at 13:53
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3 Answers

up vote 320 down vote accepted

Introduction: This answer tries to focus on the basic aspects in current C++03 of dependent names, as well as the typename and template disambiguation keywords. Other aspects should be handled in another answer or another FAQ entry.


In order to parse a C++ program, you need to know for certain names whether they name types or non-types. The following should suffice as an example

t * f;

How should this be parsed? Usually, for simple languages for parsing you don't need to know the meaning of a name but can just grammatically analyze the input and then create a parse tree out of it. In C++, the above can yield different parse-trees depending on what t means. If it's a type, then it will be parsed as a declaration (and semantically it will declare f as a pointer variable). However if it's a non-type, it will be parsed as an expression. So the draft Standard says at 3.7

Some names denote types or templates. In general, whenever a name is encountered it is necessary to determine whether that name denotes one of these entities before continuing to parse the program that contains it. The process that determines this is called name lookup.

This however presents a problem in templates: How will you find out what a name t::x refers to, if t refers to a template type parameter? x could be a static data member or member function (non-type) or could equally well be a nested class or typedef.

Dependencies

In template declarations some constructs have different meanings depending on what template arguments you use to instantiate the template: Expressions may have different types or values, variables may have different types or function calls might end up calling different functions. Such constructs are generally said to depend on template parameters.

The Standard defines precisely the rules by whether a construct is dependent or not. It separates them into logically different groups: One catches types, another catches expressions. Expressions may depend by their value and/or their type. So we have, with typical examples appended

  • Dependent types (e.g: a type template parameter T)
  • Value-dependent expressions (e.g: a non-type template parameter N)
  • Type-dependent expressions (e.g: a cast to a type template parameter (T)0)

Most of the rules are intuitive and are built up recursively: For example, a type constructed as T[N] is a dependent type if N is a value-dependent expression or T is a dependent type. The details of this can be read in section 14.6.2/1 for dependent types, 14.6.2.2 for type-dependent expressions and 14.6.2.3 for value-dependent expressions.

Dependent names

Now of all the constructs that denote dependent types or expressions, a subset of them represent names. A name can take different forms - the draft Standard says

A name is a use of an identifier (2.11), operator-function-id (13.5), conversion-function-id (12.3.2), or template-id (14.2) that denotes an entity or label (6.6.4, 6.1)

An identifier is just a plain sequence of characters / digits, while the next two are the operator + and operator type form. The last form is template-name <argument list>. All these are names, and by conventional use in the Standard, a name can also include qualifiers that say what namespace or class a name should be looked up in.

A value dependent expression 1 + N is not a name, but N is. The subset of all dependent constructs that are names is called dependent name. Function names, however, may have different meaning in different instantiations of a template, but unfortunately are not caught by this general rule.

Dependent function names

Not primarily a concern of this article, but still worth mentioning: Function names are an exception that are handled separately. An identifier function name is dependent not by itself, but by the type dependent argument expressions used in a call. In the example f((T)0), f is a dependent name. In the Standard, this is specified at 14.6.2/1.

The "typename" keyword

Let's get back to our initial problem - how can we parse t::x * f;? The answer is: In this case, we decide how the compiler should parse this. If t::x is a dependent name, then we need to prefix it by typename to tell the compiler to parse it in a certain way. The Standard says at 14.6/2

A name used in a template declaration or definition and that is dependent on a template-parameter is assumed not to name a type unless the applicable name lookup finds a type name or the name is qualified by the keyword typename.

There are many dependent names for which typename is not necessary, because the compiler can, with the applicable name lookup in the template definition, figure out how to parse a construct itself - for example with T *f;, when T is a type template parameter. But for t::x * f; to be a declaration must be written as typename t::x *f;. If you omit the keyword and the name is taken to be a non-type, but when instantiation finds it denotes a type, the usual error messages are emitted by the compiler. Since whether it's a type or not determines parsing, you will often get parser errors already at definition time

// t::x is taken as non-type, but as an expression the following misses an
// operator between the two names or a semicolon separating them.
t::x f;

The syntax allows typename only before qualified names - it is therefor taken as granted that unqualified names are always known to refer to types if they do so.

A similar gotcha exists for names that denote templates, as hinted at by the introductory text.

The "template" keyword

Have you ever wondered how the following is parsed?

boost::function< int() > f;

Possibly not, because it might look obvious to a human reader. Not so for the compiler. Imagine the following arbitrary definition of boost::function and f

namespace boost { int function = 0; }
int main() { 
  int f = 0;
  boost::function< int() > f; 
}

That's actually a valid expression! It compares boost::function with zero (int()), and then compares the resulting bool against f. However as you might well know, boost::function in real life is a template, so the compiler knows (14.2/3)

After name lookup (3.4) finds that a name is a template-name, if this name is followed by a <, the < is always taken as the beginning of a template-argument-list and never as a name followed by the less-than operator

Now we are back to the same problem as with typename. What if we can't know yet whether the name is a template when parsing the code? We will need to insert template immediately before the template name, as specified by 14.2/4. This looks like

t::template f<int>(); // call a function template

Template names can not only occur after a :: but also after a -> or . in a class member access. You need to insert the keyword there too

this->template f<int>(); // call a function template

Additional notes and examples

In enough cases we need both of typename and template. Your code should look like the following

template <typename T, typename Tail>
struct UnionNode : public Tail {
    // ...
    template<typename U> struct inUnion {
        typedef typename Tail::template inUnion<U> dummy;
    };
    // ...
};

The keyword template doesn't always have to appear in the last part of a name. It can appear in the middle before a class name that's used as a scope, like in the following example

typename t::template iterator<int>::value_type v;

In some cases, the keywords are forbidden, as detailed below

  • On the name of a dependent base class you are not allowed to write typename. It's assumed that the name given is a class type name. This is true for both names in the base-class list and the constructor initalizer list

     template <typename T>
     struct derive_from_Has_type : /* typename */ SomeBase<T>::type 
     { };
    
  • In using-declarations it's not possible to use template after the last ::, and the C++ committee said not to work on a solution.

     template <typename T>
     struct derive_from_Has_type : SomeBase<T> {
        using SomeBase<T>::template type; // error
        using typename SomeBase<T>::type; // typename *is* allowed
     };
    
  • In current C++, typename and template is disallowed anywhere outside a template, including explicit (full) template specializations. In C++0x, this will be allowed for both template and typename.

     template <> struct derive_from_Has_type<int> { 
       typedef Int<int>::template Has_Type<int> type; // error
     };
    
share|improve this answer
4  
This answer was copied from my earlier FAQ entry which I removed, because I found that I should better use existing similar questions instead of making up new "pseudo questions" just for the purpose of answering them. Thanks go to @Prasoon, who edited the ideas of the last part (cases where typename/template is forbidden) into the answer. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 22 '10 at 18:29
    
this is awesome FAQ. Everything at one place. Good job. Keep it up. :-) –  Nawaz Dec 11 '10 at 18:17
1  
Can you help me when should I use this syntax? this->template f<int>(); I get this error 'template' (as a disambiguator) is only allowed within templates but without the template keyword, it works fine. –  balki Feb 2 '11 at 7:51
    
@Nawaz ohh thanks! –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 2 '11 at 10:45
2  
The presentation of this answer is simply marvelous. It is well-thought and brings pause to anyone that reads it to question what they really think they know about how the language "works". I wish I could up-vote it more than once. –  WhozCraig Apr 20 '13 at 18:24
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C++11

Problem

While the rules in C++03 about when you need typename and template are largely reasonable, there is one annoying disadvantage of its formulation

template<typename T>
struct A {
  typedef int result_type;

  void f() {
    // error, "this" is dependent, "template" keyword needed
    this->g<float>();

    // OK
    g<float>();

    // error, "A<T>" is dependent, "typename" keyword needed
    A<T>::result_type n1;

    // OK
    result_type n2; 
  }

  template<typename U>
  void g();
};

As can be seen, we need the disambiguation keyword even if the compiler could perfectly figure out itself that A::result_type can only be int (and is hence a type), and this->g can only be the member template g declared later (even if A is explicitly specialized somewhere, that would not affect the code within that template, so its meaning cannot be affected by a later specialization of A!).

Current instantiation

To improve the situation, in C++11 the language tracks when a type refers to the enclosing template. To know that, the type must have been formed by using a certain form of name, which is its own name (in the above, A, A<T>, ::A<T>). A type referenced by such a name is known to be the current instantiation. There may be multiple types that are all the current instantiation if the type from which the name is formed is a member/nested class (then, A::NestedClass and A are both current instantiations).

Based on this notion, the language says that CurrentInstantiation::Foo, Foo and CurrentInstantiationTyped->Foo (such as A *a = this; a->Foo) are all member of the current instantiation if they are found to be members of a class that is the current instantiation or one of its non-dependent base classes (by just doing the name lookup immediately).

The keywords typename and template are now not required anymore if the qualifier is a member of the current instantiation. A keypoint here to remember is that A<T> is still a type-dependent name (after all T is also type dependent). But A<T>::result_type is known to be a type - the compiler will "magically" look into this kind of dependent types to figure this out.

struct B {
  typedef int result_type;
};

template<typename T>
struct C { }; // could be specialized!

template<typename T>
struct D : B, C<T> {
  void f() {
    // OK, member of current instantiation!
    // A::result_type is not dependent: int
    D::result_type r1;

    // error, not a member of the current instantiation
    D::questionable_type r2;

    // OK for now - relying on C<T> to provide it
    // But not a member of the current instantiation
    typename D::questionable_type r3;        
  }
};

That's impressive, but can we do better? The language even goes further and requires that an implementation again looks up D::result_type when instantiating D::f (even if it found its meaning already at definition time). When now the lookup result differs or results in ambiguity, the program is ill-formed and a diagnostic must be given. Imagine what happens if we defined C like this

template<>
struct C<int> {
  typedef bool result_type;
  typedef int questionable_type;
};

A compiler is required to catch the error when instantiating D<int>::f. So you get the best of the two worlds: "Delayed" lookup protecting you if you could get in trouble with dependent base classes, and also "Immediate" lookup that frees you from typename and template.

Unknown specializations

In the code of D, the name typename D::questionable_type is not a member of the current instantiation. Instead the language marks it as a member of an unknown specialization. In particular, this is always the case when you are doing DependentTypeName::Foo or DependentTypedName->Foo and either the dependent type is not the current instantiation (in which case the compiler can give up and say "we will look later what Foo is) or it is the current instantiation and the name was not found in it or its non-dependent base classes and there are also dependent base classes.

Imagine what happens if we had a member function h within the above defined A class template

void h() {
  typename A<T>::questionable_type x;
}

In C++03, the language allowed to catch this error because there could never be a valid way to instantiate A<T>::h (whatever argument you give to T). In C++11, the language now has a further check to give more reason for compilers to implement this rule. Since A has no dependent base classes, and A declares no member questionable_type, the name A<T>::questionable_type is neither a member of the current instantiation nor a member of an unknown specialization. In that case, there should be no way that that code could validly compile at instantiation time, so the language forbids a name where the qualifier is the current instantiation to be neither a member of an unknown specialization nor a member of the current instantiation (however, this violation is still not required to be diagnosed).

Examples and trivia

You can try this knowledge on this answer and see whether the above definitions make sense for you on a real-world example (they are repeated slightly less detailed in that answer).

The C++11 rules make the following valid C++03 code ill-formed (which was not intended by the C++ committee, but will probably not be fixed)

struct B { void f(); };
struct A : virtual B { void f(); };

template<typename T>
struct C : virtual B, T {
  void g() { this->f(); }
};

int main() { 
  C<A> c; c.g(); 
}

This valid C++03 code would bind this->f to A::f at instantiation time and everything is fine. C++11 however immediately binds it to B::f and requires a double-check when instantiating, checking whether the lookup still matches. However when instantiating C<A>::g, the Dominance Rule applies and lookup will find A::f instead.

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2  
Good stuff this. Will have to reread sometime soon. +1 –  sehe Jul 10 '13 at 20:08
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typedef typename Tail::inUnion<U> dummy;

However, I'm not sure you're implementation of inUnion is correct. If I understand correctly, this class is not supposed to be instantiated, therefore the "fail" tab will never avtually fails. Maybe it would be better to indicates whether the type is in the union or not with a simple boolean value.

template <typename T, typename TypeList> struct Contains;

template <typename T, typename Head, typename Tail>
struct Contains<T, UnionNode<Head, Tail> >
{
    enum { result = Contains<T, Tail>::result };
};

template <typename T, typename Tail>
struct Contains<T, UnionNode<T, Tail> >
{
    enum { result = true };
};

template <typename T>
struct Contains<T, void>
{
    enum { result = false };
};

PS: Have a look at Boost::Variant

PS2: Have a look at typelists, notably in Andrei Alexandrescu's book: Modern C++ Design

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inUnion<U> would be instantiated, if you for instance tried to call Union<float,bool>::operator=(U) with U==int. It calls a private set(U, inUnion<U>* = 0). –  MSalters Mar 5 '09 at 10:52
    
And the work with result=true/false is that I'd need boost::enable_if< >, which is incompatible with our current OSX toolchain. The separate template is still a good idea, though. –  MSalters Mar 5 '09 at 10:55
    
Luc means the typedef Tail::inUnion<U> dummy; line. that will instantiate Tail. but not inUnion<U>. it gets instantiated when it needs the full definition of it. that happens for example if you take the sizeof, or access a member (using ::foo). @MSalters anyway, you've got another problem: –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 5 '09 at 14:56
    
-sizeof(U) is never negative :) because size_t is an unsigned integer type. you will get some very high number. you probably want to do sizeof(U) >= 1 ? -1 : 1 or similar :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 5 '09 at 14:58
    
i would just leave it undefined and only declare it: template<typename U> struct inUnion; so it certainly can't be instantiated. i think having it with the sizeof, the compiler is allowed also to give you an error even if you not instantiate it, because if knows sizeof(U) is always >=1 and ... –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 5 '09 at 15:07
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