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I want to remove all the characters that appear after "$" sign in my string using javascript.

Is there any function in javascript which can help me achieve this. I am quite new to client side scripting.

Thanks.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

there are a few different ways

var myStr = "asdasrasdasd$hdghdfgsdfgf";
myStr = myStr.split("$")[0];

Or

var myStr = "asdasrasdasd$hdghdfgsdfgf";
myStr = myStr.substring(0, myStr.indexOf("$") - 1);
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How about this

astr.split("$")[0];

NB This will get you all of the characters up to the $. If you want that character too you will have to append it to this result.

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You can try this regex, it will replace the first occurance of $ and everything after it with a $.

str.replace(/\$.*/, '$');

Input: I have $100
Output: I have $

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GREAT! I used this! Thanks a lot!! –  user1555112 Jul 4 at 6:59

You need to get the substring and pass the index of the $ as it's second parameter.

var newString = oldString.substring(0, oldString.indexOf("$", 0))
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Use the subtring and indexOf methods like so:

var someString = "12345$67890";
alert(someString.substring(0, someString.indexOf('$')));

jsFiddle example

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Use .split() to break it up at the dollar signs and then grab the first chunk:

var oldstring = "my epic string $ more stuff";
var split = oldstring.split("$");
var newstring = split[0] + "$";
alert(newstring); //outputs "my epic string $"
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Regular expressions are very helpful:

/([^$]*\$?)/.exec("aa$bc")[1] === "aa$"
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1  
Note: sort of fails if the string does not contain a $ –  Claudio May 23 '11 at 21:03
1  
This should be /([^$]*\$?)/ –  Rocket Hazmat May 23 '11 at 21:05
1  
Thanks for the suggestion, actually the OP implies that there always is a $ though. –  pimvdb May 23 '11 at 21:07

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