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I have a rather simple web-service which exposes data from sql server. It will be used to synchronize data between 2 different databases (SQL Server and Lotus Notes). We're in the stage of testing the web-service and poll it with 20 req./min., the first 2 minutes it goes OK, but after the second, we're getting an exception, obviously the connection (to the database) can't be opened(timeout).

Do you have any tips/recommendations on what to do or where to look at? The web-service has been programmed using C#/.NET, the connection to the db is opened during construction of (web-service) object and closed when the object is disposed.

I've considered using global.asax to "share" the connection but after some googling I found out most people find that a bad idea and I'm looking for a different solution.

ps. the service is pooled in a synchronous way, no 2 requests exist at the same time

-edit- (after first 2 anwsers about pooling) This is current code:

public class DataService : System.Web.Services.WebService
{
    private SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=ip;database=database;uid=user;pwd=secret;");
    public DataService () 
    {
            try
            {
                conn.Open();

            }
            catch (Exception dbconn)
            {
                throw new SoapException("Couldn't open connection to database:" + dbconn.Message + " More info at: " + dbconn.HelpLink, errorCode);
            }
            //Uncomment the following line if using designed components 
            //InitializeComponent(); 
    }
    ~DataService()
    {
         conn.Close();
    }
    [WebMethod(Description="Gets all Person changes(from last week)")]
    public Person[] GetPerson()
    { 
            Person[] Personen = null;
            SqlCommand sqlcmd = conn.CreateCommand();

            sqlcmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM Person";
            SqlDataReader Rows = sqlcmd.ExecuteReader();
            while (Rows.Read())
            {
                    //doSomething
            }

            Rows.Close();
            return Personen;
    }

}

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sounds like you've exhausted the connection pool -- best option is to wrap you SQL calls with using blocks, loosely thus:

using( SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection( "MyConnectionString" ) )
{
    con.Open();

    using( SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand( "MyStoredProcedure", con ) )
    {
        // Do stuff with the Command
    }
}

This will allow you to serve concurrently the same number of requests as the size of your connection pool.

So, the code after your edit becomes:

public class DataService : System.Web.Services.WebService
{
    [WebMethod(Description="Gets all Person changes(from last week)")]
    public Person[] GetPerson()
    { 
        Person[] Personen = null;

        using( SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=ip;database=database;uid=user;pwd=secret;") )
        {
            using( SqlCommand sqlcmd = conn.CreateCommand() )
            {
                sqlcmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM Person";
                SqlDataReader Rows = sqlcmd.ExecuteReader( CommandBehavior.CloseConnection ); // This will close the DB connection ASAP
                while (Rows.Read())
                {
                    //doSomething
                }

                Rows.Close();
            }
        }

        return Personen;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is it any better than setting the connection at object construction? (I've added some code to elaborate). Is there any way to check the connection pool prior to connecting or somehow monitor it? – Tuxified Mar 4 '09 at 13:20
    
This is the recommended way to use database connections. Open it, do whatever you need to do, and close / dispose it. The using clause will dispose of the connection automatically. The next time you need a connection the same connection will be returned from the connection pool. – Rune Grimstad Mar 4 '09 at 13:38
    
I used your suggestion and after some small tests it can now handle more than 200 sequential requests without problems. Thanx! – Tuxified Mar 5 '09 at 17:10

See in this link Best Practices for Using ADO.NET, in it you will find a link to SQL Server Connection Pooling (ADO.NET) - make sure you really are using a connection pool correctly.

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