Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to write a cmdlet that read multiple records from a database and puts them onto the pipeline.

I think I can do either a single WriteObject(Enumerable<rec>, true) or a can loop myself and call WriteObject multiple times

Whats the difference between these 2

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is the documentation: Cmdlet.WriteObject Method (Object, Boolean)

And here is the example:

# Writes objects one by one
function Test1
{
    [CmdletBinding()]param()
    $data | %{ $PSCmdlet.WriteObject($_) }
}

# Writes the collection and allows the core to enumerate it one level.
# Numbers of written objects is the collection item count.
function Test2
{
    [CmdletBinding()]param()
    $PSCmdlet.WriteObject($data, $true)
}

# Writes the collection as a single object.
# Numbers of written objects is 1.
function Test3
{
    [CmdletBinding()]param()
    $PSCmdlet.WriteObject($data, $false)
}

function Test
{
    (Test1).GetType().Name
    (Test2).GetType().Name
    (Test3).GetType().Name
}

$data = New-Object System.Collections.ArrayList

Write-Host "1 item"
$null = $data.Add('hello')
Test

Write-Host "2+ items"
$null = $data.Add('world')
Test

Output:

1 item
String
String
ArrayList
2+ items
Object[]
Object[]
ArrayList

Thus, calling WriteObject(item) for each item in a collection is basically the same as WriteObject(items, true); in both cases the collection itself has gone. WriteObject(items, false) is different, it returns reference to the collection and the caller can use that effectively depending on a scenario. For example, if a collection is a DataTable object (not unrolled set of DataRow items) then a caller can operate on DataTable members of the returned object.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for posting nice examples –  CB. Jul 4 '13 at 12:08
add comment

Well, WriteObject(Object, boolean) will allow you to output a collection and have it stay intact (if called with "false" for the second argument). Normally PowerShell will enumerate any collections that get put on the pipeline.

So you could output a string array and the result would be of type [String[]]. While if you let PowerShell unwrap it, it will be an array of strings in a [Object[]].

You can also call that overload with "true" and it will be just like a loop calling WriteObject(Object).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.