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What's the difference between classic Javascript code:

document.getElementById('theID')

and the jQuery version:

$('#theID')

because I used the second in a project and I got error instead of the first that works perfectly.

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1  
can you post the error? –  danyolgiax May 23 '11 at 22:31
4  
I love that regular JS is called "classic". –  spanky May 23 '11 at 22:32
    
We need the error :) –  Oscar Godson May 23 '11 at 22:35
2  
@Spanky i think there needs to be a new tag started on SO "classic-javascript" due to the amount of questions asked that clearly state "no jQuery" or they dont even reference jQuery ever and people still just post jQuery snippets haha –  Oscar Godson May 23 '11 at 22:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted

document.getElementById returns a DOM object. This is the browser's native way of thinking about an element in the page. It has various methods and properties. These can be a little clunky to use.

The jQuery object (created by the $ method) is a wrapper around a DOM element or a set of DOM elements. The normal properties and methods are not available; you get a selection of different methods that make the process of DOM manipulation more intuitive.

The difference is more clear to see with multiple elements in the selection (as you would get with a class selector $('.someClass') for instance, but the methods on a jQuery selection are different to the ones on a native DOM element. They point to the same thing, but they are different ways of thinking about it and dealing with it.


As a final note, you can convert a jQuery selection into its native DOM element(s) with the get method (edit: or the alternative array-like syntax). So

document.getElementById('theID')

is exactly the same as

$('#theID').get(0) // or $('#theId')[0]

Note, however, that you should use the first, as it has much better performance. Only use jQuery if you need the extra functionality it provides.

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Why .get(0) instead of [0] ? –  Raynos May 23 '11 at 22:38
    
@Raynos Explicitness... I've added the alternative notation. –  lonesomeday May 23 '11 at 22:41
    
Thanks for your help that's the answer i would expected to listen.. :) –  Andrew Ckor May 23 '11 at 22:47

Well in your second project, you might not have included the jQuery files at the the top.

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I bet thats what this is... –  Oscar Godson May 23 '11 at 22:34
    
No the jQuery was linked correctly, the error was old but the code i used is document.getElementById('viewport').scrollTop When i change the getElement didn't work... –  Andrew Ckor May 23 '11 at 22:39

No difference, you just need to have the jQuery library installed and referenced in your project.

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In that case, I guess this should print the same to console (select element): var element = document.getElementById($(this).attr('id')); console.log(element.selectedIndex); console.log($(this).attr('selectedIndex')); but it doesn't. The first one prints the index while the other one prints 'undefined' –  Nicsoft May 30 '12 at 7:43

Make sure to include

<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js"></script>

In your <head>

If you don't load jQuery then you cannot use $ as jQuery is an external library and not part of JavaScript.

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