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In F#, I am parsing a decimal string with

let foo str =
    match Decimal.TryParse str with
    | (true, result) -> Some result
    | (false, _) -> None

which uses the current system culture to parse the string. But I actually want to parse the string using CultureInfo.InvariantCulture. Can this be done in a pattern matching manner like above? If not, what is the cleanest way to do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use something like:

 let foo str =
     match System.Decimal.TryParse(str, NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) with
     | (true, result) -> Some result
     | (false, _) -> None 
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Thanks Bas. I didn't notice the NumberStyles in the middle, which caused my compile to fail. –  hwaien May 23 '11 at 23:18

You need to use overload that takes NumberStyles as the second argument and CultureInfo as the third. Since this is a .NET method, the arguments are tupled (except that F# compiler turns the last byref argument into a return typle):

let foo str =
  match Decimal.TryParse(str, NumberStyles.None, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) with
  | (true, result) -> Some result
  | (false, _) -> None

The type signature of the method (as shown in Visual Studio tool tip) is:

Decimal.TryParse(s:string, style:NumberStyles, provider:IFormatProvider, result:byref<decimal>) : bool

When using the method with pattern matching, the compiler turns all byref arguments from the end of the argument list into (last) elements of the returned tuple, but it keeps the parameters as a tuple, so you have to call the method using the TryParse(foo, bar) notation.

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use another overload of TryParse method

open System
open System.Globalization
let parse s = 
    match Decimal.TryParse(s, NumberStyles.Number, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) with
    | true, v -> Some v
    | false, _ -> None
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