Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm using the checkForErrors method shown below to check for errors in a txt file. The method performs an expected, expect that the OS File Handle associated with method parameter f is not being released. This causes a downstream external .exe to fail with the error message "The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process."

Are they any obvious memory management issues that I failed to address?

private boolean checkForErrors(File f)
{
    FileInputStream fis = null;
    FileChannel fc = null;

    try
    {
        if (!f.exists())
        {
            return true;
        }

        // get a Channel for the source file
        fis = new FileInputStream(f);
        fc = fis.getChannel();

        Pattern errorPattern = Pattern.compile("ERROR");
        Pattern eoPattern = Pattern.compile("END OF OUTPUT ");

        // get a CharBuffer from the source file
        ByteBuffer bb = fc.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, (int) fc.size());
        Charset cs = Charset.forName("8859_1");
        CharsetDecoder cd = cs.newDecoder();
        CharBuffer cb = cd.decode(bb);

        // check for the presence of the ERROR keyword
        Matcher eP = errorPattern.matcher(cb);

        if (eP.find())
        {
            return true;
        }

        // check for the ABSENCE of the end of output keywords
        Matcher eoP = eoPattern.matcher(cb);

        if (!eoP.find())
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    catch (IOException ex)
    {
        LOG.log(Level.INFO, null, ex);

        return true;
    }
    finally
    {
        try
        {
            if (fc != null)
            {
                fc.close();
                fc = null;
            }

            if (fis != null)
            {
                fis.close();
                fis = null;
            }
        }
        catch (IOException ex)
        {
            LOG.log(Level.INFO, null, ex);
        }
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this question
    
I could not replicate this on Ubuntu 10.04. Maybe your OS is causing the issue as was suggested here – mut1na May 23 '11 at 23:29
1  
appears to be related to the use of FileChannel's map method to obtain a memory-mapped byte buffer. Replaced the mapped byte buffer with a start wrapped buffer and the problem went away. – javacavaj May 24 '11 at 17:56
    
@javacavaj: can you please answer the question yourself and then accept that answer? Also, you need to accept answers to previous questions if they fix your problem. – Zecas May 16 '12 at 14:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.