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I have an interface:

interface IInterface 
{
    string Name { get; }
}

that is implemented by an generic abstract class:

public class BInterface<T> : IInterface
{
    static BInterface() 
    { 
        // Or anything that would be implementation class specific
        Name = typeof(BInterface<>).GetType().Name;  
    }
    public static string Name { get; private set; }
    string IInterface.Name { get { return Name; } }
}

Which is in turn implemented in a concrete class:

public class CInterface : BInterface<int> 
{
}

I know how to get the references to the concrete classes via 'type.IsAssignableFrom', '!type.IsInterface' and '!type.IsAbstract', but that is as far as I have managed.

I need to get, via Reflection, the VALUE of the static Name property for any of the concrete classes. However, for the life of my poor brain, I cannot figure the code to accomplish this. Any hints would be great.

EDIT (In clarification):

I am aware that the static property needs to read from the base class. However....

The static field will contain the base name of the concrete class --> derived via reflection in the static constructor of the base class. This works (and I know how to accomplish it) as we do it all over the place.

I this case, I am attempting to build a factory class that needs to know this static field, and needs to get to it via Reflection due to the some (other) requirements of the factory implementation.

EDIT (again) Expanded code:

Here is a nearly complete, if useless, example of what I am attempting to accomplish.

    public interface IInterface
    {
        string Name { get; }
        object Value { get; set; }
    }

    public class BInterface<T> : IInterface
    {
        static BInterface()
        {
            // Or anything that would be implementation class specific
            Name = typeof(BInterface<>).GetType().Name; // Should be CInterface, DInterface depending on which class it is called from.
        }

    string IInterface.Name { get { return Name; } }
    object IInterface.Value { get { return Value; } set { Value = (T)value; } }

    public static string Name { get; private set; }
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

public class CInterface : BInterface<int>
{
}

public class DInterface : BInterface<double>
{
}

public static class InterfaceFactory
{
    private readonly static IDictionary<string, Type> InterfaceClasses;

    static InterfaceFactory()
    {
        InterfaceClasses = new Dictionary<string, Type>();

        var assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();
        var interfaceTypes = assembly.GetTypes()
                                     .Where( type => type.IsAssignableFrom(typeof (IInterface)) 
                                         && !type.IsInterface 
                                         && !type.IsAbstract);
        foreach (var type in interfaceTypes)
        {
            // Get name somehow
            var name = "...";
            InterfaceClasses.Add(name, type);
        }
    }

    public static IInterface Create(string key, object value, params object[] parameters)
    {
        if (InterfaceClasses.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            var instance = (IInterface) Activator.CreateInstance(InterfaceClasses[key], parameters);
            instance.Value = value;

            return instance;
        }
        return null;
    }
}

The part in the static constructor of the IntefaceFactory inside the foreach loop is what I am attempting to solve. Hopefully, this is clearer.

share|improve this question
    
Why does it have to be through Reflection? Your implementation class clearly returns the static property as its implementation. Any concrete instance of the class will thus return that static property by just using the interface. –  pickypg May 24 '11 at 1:41
    
@pickypg: That's kind of missing the point of the question. The OP clearly thinks each inherited member gets its own "class instance" of the static member Name that will differ for each class. This is, of course, not the case. –  Jason May 24 '11 at 1:42
    
@Jason I kind of agree, but I think the entire desire is either misguided or homework. –  pickypg May 24 '11 at 1:46
    
@pickypg: We are in agreement. –  Jason May 24 '11 at 1:47
    
I don't think your code compiles. You are accessing a static property Name from an instance method IInterface.Name directly in the class BInterface<T>. –  Danny Chen May 24 '11 at 1:51
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is how to get static property of concrete class from the instance:

var staticProperty = instance.GetType()
    .GetProperty("<PropertyName>", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);
var value = staticProperty.GetValue(instance, null);
share|improve this answer
    
@Jason: But the question doesn't make sense, so... –  Ed S. May 24 '11 at 1:58
    
@Ed S - I tried to find some. At least I found sense in the question title and did exactly what question title asks. –  Alex Aza May 24 '11 at 2:01
    
@Ed S.: I agree with you. –  Jason May 24 '11 at 13:20
    
tnx.. it worked for me –  Vasile Surdu Aug 8 '13 at 8:17
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static members don't work the way you are thinking. They belong to the base class and thus what you are attempting is not possible with a static inherited member.

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