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How would I overload the >> and << operators if they are dealing with pointers?

in header:

friend std::istream& operator >>( std::istream& ins, Classname* & e);
friend std::ostream& operator <<( std::ostream& outs, const Classname * e);

in cpp:

std::ostream& operator <<( std::ostream& outs, const Classname * e)
{   // what do I do here?
return outs;
}
std::istream& operator >>( std::istream& ins, Classname* & e){
// what do I do here?
    return ins;
}
share|improve this question
    
well, what you do depends on what you want to read/write from Classname. You access the variables through the -> operator, other than that I am not sure what you're after. for instance: outs << e->variable; –  Default May 24 '11 at 4:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends on what is in the class Classname. If for example you have:

class Classname {
//...
private:
  int a;
};

.. then you might do:

std::ostream& operator <<( std::ostream& outs, const Classname * e)
{  
  outs << e->a;
  return outs;
}
std::istream& operator >>( std::istream& ins, Classname* & e){
    ins >> e->a;
    return ins;
}

The idea being that the << and >> operators ideally should mirror each other - so for example you can make use of them for serializing and deserializing your instances.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you SO MUCH. Had tried this but now realized it crashed because i passed a null. I need some help understanding it though. What exactly does Classname* & e mean? I think const Classname * e means e is a pointer to a const Classname... –  zatch_rulz May 24 '11 at 4:49
    
The second is a 'reference to a pointer' - so you could actually modify 'e' and see the effect on the variable you passed in. –  sje397 May 24 '11 at 5:32

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