Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I overload the << operator? From the error I am getting, it seems that std::cout doesn't know how to use <<.

This is in a class:

// uint64_t UPPER, LOWER;
std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & stream){
    if (UPPER)
        stream << UPPER;
    stream << LOWER;
    return stream;
}

I am getting error: no match for 'operator<<' in 'std::cout << test' which doesn't seem to make sense.

edit:

Neither this:

std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & stream, uint128_t const & val){
    if (val.upper())
        stream << val.upper();
    stream << val.lower();
    return stream;
}

nor this:

std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & stream, uint128_t val){
    if (val.upper())
        stream << val.upper();
    stream << val.lower();
    return stream;
}

is changing the error.

share|improve this question
1  
is test an ostream or a string? –  Benoit May 24 '11 at 5:26
    
I think you must add friend to your function.. see here java2s.com/Tutorial/Cpp/0200__Operator-Overloading/… –  Gaurav Shah May 24 '11 at 5:26
1  
can you post the class in which this is defined and how you are using it? –  Naveen May 24 '11 at 5:27
    
im just trying to use << like the << for ints/strings/chars/etc. nothing special –  calccrypto May 24 '11 at 5:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The << operator takes two arguments, a left hand side, and a right hand side. Therefore you have to define the function with two parameters:

std::ostream operator<<(std::ostream &os, const MyClass &obj);

And you have to define it outside of your class definition, as far as I can remember. Inside of the class definition you can only have operators that take that class as the left hand side.

share|improve this answer
    
that did the trick –  calccrypto May 24 '11 at 5:32

You typically want the operator<<() overload to be a 'free function' (outside of your class) so it can bind to the stream naturally:

// this is outside your class definition
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const myclass& rhs)
{
    // whatever...

    return os;
}

Then inside your class you declare it a friend if necessary so it can get to the class internals:

friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const myclass& rhs);

An alternative to having this be a friend (which some people consider to be breaking encapsulation) is to have a public function in your class that will output itself to a stream and call that in your operator<<() overload:

// inside class myclass - a normal public member function
std::ostream& dump( std::ostream& os)
{
    os << some_class_member; 

    // ...

    return os;
}


// now, the `operator<<()` overload doesn't need to be a friend
// this is still outside your class definition
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const myclass& rhs)
{
    return rhs.dump(os);
}
share|improve this answer

operator<< outside a class requires two arguments:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, type_you_want_output const& thing)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.