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my supermarket model contains a StockItem class and an Alert class which contains a StockItem field:

public class StockItem
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int CurrentQuantity { get; set; }
    public int MinQuantity { get; set; }
}

public class Alert
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public int Message{ get; set; }
    public virtual StockItem StockItem { get; set; }
}

I Have a function that fetches all StockItems with one DbContext:

using (var db = new MyDbContext())
{
     return db.StockItems.ToList();
}

And another function that process these items, and adding new Alerts in a another DbContext:

foreach (var item in items)
{
     if (item.CurrentQuantity < item.MinQuantity)
     {
        using (var db = new MyDbContext())
        {
            db.Alerts.Add(new Alert(){StockItem = item, Message = "Low Quantity"});
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
     }
}

The problem is: When an Alert is Saved, a new Stock Item (with a different id) is added to the database, although it is already there! any solutions?

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2 Answers 2

I think you should Attach the stockitem first. Try this:

foreach (var item in items)
{
     if (item.CurrentQuantity < item.MinQuantity)
     {
        using (var db = new MyDbContext())
        {
            db.StockItems.Attach(item);
            db.Alerts.Add(new Alert {StockItem = item, Message = "Low Quantity"});
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see. but now i have to perform attach in many cases of db.SaveChanges(). Can't Entity Framework know automatically, according to the StockItem's ID, that it is already in the DB? –  Sean May 24 '11 at 8:24
    
if you create a new context, ef can't know it without quering the db... so, if you don't like to reattach you should change the context lifecycle (not dispose after every operation and cache the context) –  benwasd May 24 '11 at 8:31
1  
@Sean: No EF will not do anything like that for you. You are responsible for telling EF what is new, updated, deleted or unchanged. By calling Add on alerts you are attaching all entities in Alert's object graph and marking all of them as inserted. –  Ladislav Mrnka May 24 '11 at 9:21
    
I did as suggested and kept one static DbContext instance, using it in the fetching method, and later in the method that creates the Alerts. it all worked great, but when i called these methods using WCF, the duplication arrived again. In debug it seemed that they're still using the same DbContext. Tried also to Config the WCF to work PerSession, and it didn't help as well. –  Sean May 24 '11 at 11:07
using (var db = new MyDbContext())
{
   var items = db.StockItems.ToList();
   foreach (var item in items)
   {
      if (item.CurrentQuantity < item.MinQuantity)
      {
         db.Alerts.Add(new Alert {StockItem = item, 
            Message = "Low Quantity"});
         db.SaveChanges();
      }
   }        
}

In this case you dont need to do attach. EF can only track changes in its own life cycle, in your first case when you do,

using (var db = new MyDbContext())
{
     return db.StockItems.ToList();
}

You are disposing MyDbContext, so EF makes all stock items as independent (detached items), and when you add them to different context, context assumes that it is a new item and it will insert the one.

The best way will be to keep Context alive throughout the changes you want to make. Also note, keeping context alive for longer time does not mean you will keep database connection open all the time. EF will open and close database connection automatically only when you are executing query and you are calling save changes.

Otherwise you have to attach as Ben suggested.

share|improve this answer
    
I did as you suggested and kept one static DbContext instance, and using it in the fetching method, and later in the method that creates the Alerts. it all worked great, but when i called these methods using WCF, the duplication arrived again. In debug it seemed that they're still using the same DbContext. Tried also to Config the WCF to work PerSession, and it didn't help as well. –  Sean May 24 '11 at 10:36
    
In WCF, your static instance will not work, instead you should use HttpContext.Current.Session to store your DbContext, this will store your context for session, but there is one problem, you should have some sort of ping where your session will stay open. Otherwise you can try to switch to RIA Services, it does pretty good job. –  Akash Kava May 24 '11 at 13:42

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