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I would like to have ctags generate a TAGS file of all my bundled gems or all the gems under the rvm gemset directory bundler installs its gems. Ideally, a bundle install or bundle update should generate a TAGS file at the last step using a ruby script I'll provide. Afterthat emacs joy.

Is there any kind of a bundler after hook I can use?

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You could look at what Tim Pope does in his Hookup project:

https://github.com/tpope/hookup

I'd imagine it wouldn't be too hard to an an extra step after the bundler run.

Personally I just have a good old Makefile in my Ruby project:

.PHONY: tags

tags:
    ETAGS=ctags
    rm -rf TAGS
    ctags -a -e -f TAGS --tag-relative -R app lib vendor

I have a shell script I run in the morning which sets up my dev environment which also runs make tags.

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1  
Or you could, you know, use rake... – diedthreetimes Jun 11 '11 at 0:05

According to https://github.com/bundler/bundler/blob/dd1e11d8f8e869ffab4fc68d4854b27e1f486de4/lib/bundler/source/path.rb, there is the ability to run 'post_install' hooks. It uses meta-programming to deduce the method name, and the gem is supposed to implement that method. Will try and check if this works

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My approach has been two pronged:

1) Put a rake task in place that generates tags for all code in the project as well as all required gems:

desc 'Create ctags'
task :tags do
  system "ctags -R --language-force=ruby app config lib `rvm gemdir`/gems"
end

2) Using the excellent "foreman" gem (which I was using anyway) to run inotifywait and fire off the rake task if a file changes:

tags: while inotifywait -q -r -e MODIFY --exclude swp$ app/ config/ lib/ ; do bundle exec rake tags; done

If you are not using foreman you can of course just run that line without the first "tags:" part manually in a shell.

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