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This is the snippet:

String s1=new String("127.0.0.1 www.google.com127.0.0.1 www.bing.com");
String s2=new String("127.0.0.1 www.google.com" + "\n" + "127.0.0.1 www.bing.com");
byte buffer1[]=s1.getBytes();
byte buffer2[]=s2.getBytes();
FileOutputStream fos=new FileOutputStream("f1.txt");
for(int i=0;i<buffer1.length;i++)
fos.write(buffer1[i]);
FileOutputStream fos2=new FileOutputStream("f2.txt");
for(int i=0;i<buffer2.length;i++)
fos2.write(buffer2[i]);
System.out.println("size of buffer1 = "+buffer1.length);
System.out.println("\nsize of buffer2 = "+buffer2.length);
String x=new String("s"+"\n"+"u");
System.out.println(x);

I do get 2 files named f1.txt and f2.txt in my current directory but I expect a 127.0.0.1 www.bing.com to be in the new line in f2.txt but it occurs in the same line (i.e., the file is same as f1.txt).

Why don't I get a new line in f2.txt when I have inserted a new line character in String constructor?

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What is your OS? what kind of line separator does it use? \r\l ? –  Hubert May 24 '11 at 8:10
    
@ Hubert win7.I use \n –  Suhail Gupta May 24 '11 at 8:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Don't use \n or similar things for new lines - this is platform dependent.

Use System.getProperty("line.separator")

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@ Bozho \n works fine for String x=new String("s"+"\n"+"u"); System.out.println(x); then why not during file writing. –  Suhail Gupta May 24 '11 at 8:25

I'm not sure what platform you're running on but, under Eclipse Galileo on Ubuntu, that works exactly as expected.

The code:

import java.io.FileOutputStream;
public class Find {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        try {
            String s1=new String("127.0.0.1 www.google.com127.0.0.1 www.bing.com");
            String s2=new String("127.0.0.1 www.google.com" + "\n" +
                "127.0.0.1 www.bing.com");

            byte buffer1[]=s1.getBytes();
            byte buffer2[]=s2.getBytes();

            FileOutputStream fos=new FileOutputStream("f1.txt");
            for(int i=0;i<buffer1.length;i++)
                fos.write(buffer1[i]);

            FileOutputStream fos2=new FileOutputStream("f2.txt");
            for(int i=0;i<buffer2.length;i++)
                fos2.write(buffer2[i]);

            System.out.println("size of buffer1 = "+buffer1.length);
            System.out.println("size of buffer2 = "+buffer2.length);

            String x=new String("s"+"\n"+"u");
            System.out.println(x);
        } catch (Exception e) {}
    }
}

outputs:

size of buffer1 = 46
size of buffer2 = 47
s
u

and the two files are different:

f1.txt:
    127.0.0.1 www.google.com127.0.0.1 www.bing.com
f2.txt:
    127.0.0.1 www.google.com
    127.0.0.1 www.bing.com

If you're using an operating system that doesn't use \n as the line separator (such as Windows), you'll still get the same output but the tools that you use to look at that file (or process it) may not work as expected. If you replaced \n with \r\n, you'd probably find the other tools then worked fine for Windows.

But, for portability, use the line.separator property rather than \n (or \r\n) directly:

String s2=new String("127.0.0.1 www.google.com" +
    System.getProperty("line.separator") +
    "127.0.0.1 www.bing.com");
share|improve this answer
    
same here on windows 7 with eclipse helios –  Thomas Jungblut May 24 '11 at 8:13
    
@ paxdiablo win7 –  Suhail Gupta May 24 '11 at 8:13
    
The point is, as @Bozho says, that solution is platform dependant - so it will work for some of you. –  Mikaveli May 24 '11 at 8:18
    
@ paxdiablo every thing is the same except the last output of f1.txt and f2.txt –  Suhail Gupta May 24 '11 at 8:18
    
+1: for editing –  Suhail Gupta May 24 '11 at 8:46

Try to find out what the separator should be. You can try \r\n for instance. It differs between Linux and Windows what characters are used for a "new line" (linefeed and carriage return)

(A carriage return means that the cursor goes to the first character, a linefeed means that the cursor goes "one line down". Depending on what your OS does, you need one or both)

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/n has been working fine on my OS.How is it that /n is not working during file writing,when the output length it shows is 46,47 respectively –  Suhail Gupta May 24 '11 at 8:39

Use Printstream over fileoutputstream:

FileOutputStream f = new FileOutputStream("f2.txt");
PrintStream ps = new PrintStream(f);
ps.print("127.0.0.1 www.google.com");
ps.println(); //this writes your new line
ps.print("127.0.0.1 www.bing.com");
ps.close();

ref: How do I write a newline using FileOutputStream

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