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Can anyone recommend some tips for understanding PC memory? I just can't seem to get it. I've read various chapters from books on memory and the stack and such, looked for info online, and tried playing with debuggers and programming stuff, but nothing seems to click.

Is there perhaps a simpler approach I could take, or a particularly intuitive tutorial someone could recommend?

Thankyou

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This reminds me of a COBOL programmer on a C course I was giving - his question: "But what is this memory stuff you keep talking about? And why would I ever want to use it?" –  nbt May 24 '11 at 8:35
    
Could you provide us with the online content you have read and not understood right?! –  DKSan May 24 '11 at 8:36
    
I just have a hard time understanding the different counters and logic behind them, more than anything..., I don't have anything specific to link to, although I suppose the wikipedia page on the stack is a fine example –  Sonny Ordell May 24 '11 at 8:49
    
Sorry - What was the question? I forgot. –  Abizern May 24 '11 at 10:25
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2 Answers 2

http://www.amazon.com/Code-Language-Computer-Hardware-Software/dp/0735611319/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1306226404&sr=8-1

Is a very good book for architecture in general.

But essentially memory is just a collection of circuits organized in rows and columns that "remember" the input. Input being 0 or 1. There is really nothing extraordinary happening.

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try this. there is a tape somewhere there. be patient, if you get through this.. then pick any popular computer architecture book. i recommend this.

Edit

ofcourse you'll need more source than just a wiki page. here. this should take only a couple of months.. but its worth it.

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