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We have a legacy interface that inserts into table T1 that values "BODY_TEXT" (varcharmax), "BODY_BIN"(varbinarymax). It currently inserts just to one of the columns, and leave the other one NULL. Now we implemented a new interface - table T2 that has only "BODY"(varbinarymax) column.

I need to create a view V1 that should replace T1, meaning

CREATE VIEW V1 AS
SELECT 
T2.UNIQUE_ID AS UNIQUE_ID,

etc…

Now I don't know how to treat T2.BODY column… I need to do something like T2.BODY AS (whatever is not null(BODY_BIN, BODY_TEXT)). It must also support varcharmax vs. varbinarymax. I tried implementing COALESCE meaning T2.BODY AS COALESCE(BODY_BIN, BODY_TEXT) but it doesn't work. Nor does

COALESCE(BODY_BIN, BODY_TEXT) AS BODY
T2.BODY AS BODY

Again - In the legacy table we had T1 with two columns - BODY_BIN and BODY_TEXT. The user inserted one value and left the other one null, since body is either binary or textual but not both. The new interface has a table T2 that has only one column, BODY (varbinarymax), and I was asked to delete table T1 and create a view with the same name. Meaning in order to preserve backward comparability they should still be able to perform "insert into T1 values X,Y" (X is DATA_BIN or NULL, and Y is DATA_TEXT or NULL), but the content (taken from either X or Y) should be translated into ONE column in the T2 table - BODY. I have no idea how to pull this one up.

Can you help me?

Thanks,

Nili

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I understand. COALESCE(<varbinary value>, <varchar value>) should work. –  Kofi Sarfo May 24 '11 at 10:06
    
Yes but please notice the direction is different - usually you "map" table to view, meaning COALESCE(DATA_BIN, DATA_TEXT) AS T.BODY, however I need to map a max value from the view, meaning T2.BODY AS COALESCE(DATA_BIN, DATA_TEXT), or something like that... –  Nili May 24 '11 at 11:19
    
Am I reading this correctly: you want to change the Column name depending on which data type is being returned? –  tobias86 May 24 '11 at 11:20
    
No Tobias. In the legacy table we had T1 with two columns - BODY_BIN and BODY_TEXT. The user inserted one value and left the other one null, since body is either binary or textual but not both. The new interface has a table T2 that has only one column, BODY (varbinarymax), and I was asked to delete table T1 and create a view with the same name. Meaning in order to preserve backward comparability they should still be able to perform "insert into T1 values X,Y" (X is DATA_BIN or NULL, and Y is DATA_TEXT or NULL), but the content should be translated into one column in the T2 table - BODY. –  Nili May 24 '11 at 11:27

2 Answers 2

varbinary to varchar (note the order) will cast implicitly. So this works because ISNULL takes the first datatype

ISNULL(varchar, varbinary)

COALESCE fails because it takes the highest precedence datatype (which is varbinary). The implicit cast is not allowed. ISNULL(varbinary, varchar) would fail too

You need an explicit CAST

DECLARE @foo TABLE (ID int IDENTITY (1,1), charmax varchar(MAX) NULL, binmax varbinary(MAX) NULL)

INSERT @foo (charmax, binmax) VALUES ('text', NULL)
INSERT @foo (charmax, binmax) VALUES (NULL, 0x303131)
INSERT @foo (charmax, binmax) VALUES ('Moretext', NULL)
INSERT @foo (charmax, binmax) VALUES (NULL, 0x414243454647)

SELECT ISNULL(binmax, CONVERT(varbinary(MAX), charmax))
FROM @foo

or

SELECT COALESCE(binmax, CONVERT(varbinary(MAX), charmax))
FROM @foo

Edit: I understand the question now... maybe

DECLARE @foo2 TABLE (ID int IDENTITY (1,1), BODY varbinary(MAX) NULL)

INSERT @foo2 (BODY) VALUES (CAST('text' AS varbinary(MAX)))
INSERT @foo2 (BODY) VALUES (0x303132)
INSERT @foo2 (BODY) VALUES (CAST('Moretext' AS varbinary(MAX)))
INSERT @foo2 (BODY) VALUES (0x414243454647)
SELECT
    BODY AS BODY_BIN,
    CAST(BODY AS varchar(MAX)) AS BOY_TEXT
FROM
    @foo2

Edit2: something like this (not tested) to maintain the same write interface. Normally, I'd only maintain a read interface hence the confusion...

CREATE VIEW OldFoo
AS
SELECT
    ID,
    BODY AS BODY_BIN,
    CAST(BODY AS varchar(MAX)) AS BOY_TEXT
FROM
    newFoo
GO
CREATE TRIGGER ON OldFoo INSTEAD OF INSERT
AS
SET NOCOUNT ON
INSERT newFoo (BODY)
SELECT ISNULL(binmax, CONVERT(varbinary(MAX), charmax))
FROM INSERTED
GO
share|improve this answer
    
I still don't know if a simple cast would work, I'm still one step behind since I don't know how to bind one "physical" column from table T2 to non-null-value-out-of-two-columns from V1... –  Nili May 24 '11 at 11:42
    
@Nili: I have given you proof it does work in my script above –  gbn May 24 '11 at 11:43
    
Ok thanks but how do I bind it from T2.BODY to V1...? –  Nili May 24 '11 at 11:46
    
@Nili: I misunderstood: updated –  gbn May 24 '11 at 11:49
    
@gbn, still not exactly what I was aiming to.. I used to have an old table - DECLARE @foo TABLE (ID int IDENTITY (1,1), BODY_BIN varbinary(MAX) NULL, BODY_TEXT varchar(max)), and now I got a new table - foo2 - exactly like you presented it. Now the requirement from me is to drop table foo, and instead create a view called foo. It should support old users, meaning support insertion of DATA_BIN AND DATA_TEXT, but "behind the scene" copy JUST ONE VALUE to the brand new table foo2... Is this a better explaination? –  Nili May 24 '11 at 11:58

First, this is a bad design. Joining on a varchar(max) or varbinary(max) field is a bad idea since they can't be indexed. Prepare for table scans!

You have inconsistent data types in the same column, which is a problem.

Try:

CAST((COALESCE(BODY_BIN, BODY_TEXT)) as varchar(max))

share|improve this answer
    
But I need to map T2 value into the non-null value, meaning I need something like: T2.Body AS CAST((COALESCE(BODY_BIN, BODY_TEXT)) as varchar(max)), but it doesn't work... –  Nili May 24 '11 at 11:15
    
@Nili: COALESCE(CAST(BODY_BIN AS varchar(max)), BODY_TEXT))? –  Andriy M May 24 '11 at 12:07

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