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What "Hidden Features" of JavaScript do you think every programmer should know?

After having seen the excellent quality of the answers to the following questions I thought it was time to ask it for JavaScript.

Even though JavaScript is arguably the most important Client Side language right now (just ask Google) it's surprising how little most web developers appreciate how powerful it really is.

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locked by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 5:47

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 5:47

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1  
Didn't you mean "Having seen the rep. points and views this other question attracted, I thought I'd ask almost exactly the same question to boost my own"? ;-) –  Bobby Jack Sep 14 '08 at 18:22
1  
Sure, pessimist. :) I'd considered making this a community question. Also, after you get a certain number of points it's all diminishing returns. –  Allain Lalonde Sep 14 '08 at 18:37
1  
Fair enough - it doesn't look as if you 'need' the rep! I guess I just have a big issue with the C# one - doesn't exactly seem to me like the type of question for which this site was intended. –  Bobby Jack Sep 14 '08 at 18:41
3  
Yeah, maybe not, but I found the knowledge in the answers great. I think you'd be hard pressed to expose an average C# programmer to all of it in one place if not for SO. It'd take years of playing with it to come up with the same hard won list. –  Allain Lalonde Sep 14 '08 at 18:54
7  
I've been writing JavaScript professionally for 10 years now and I learned a thing or three from this thread. Thanks, Alan! –  Andrew Hedges Sep 20 '08 at 7:39

99 Answers 99

Here's a simple way of thinking about 'this'. 'This' inside a function will refer to future object instances of the function, usually created with operator new. So clearly 'this' of an inner function will never refer to an instance of an outer function.

The above should keep one out of trouble. But there are more complicated things you can do with 'this.'


Example 1:


     function DriveIn()
     {
          this.car = 'Honda';
          alert(this.food);  //'food' is the attribute of a future object 
                             //and DriveIn does not define it.
     }

     var A = {food:'chili', q:DriveIn};  //create object A whose q attribute 
                                         //is the function DriveIn;

     alert(A.car); //displays 'undefined' 
     A.q();        //displays 'chili' but also defines this.car.
     alert(A.car); //displays 'Honda' 


The Rule of This:

Whenever a function is called as the attribute of an object, any occurrence of 'this' inside the function (but outside any inner functions) refers to the object.

We need to make clear that "The Rule of This" applies even when operator new is used. Behind the scenes new attaches 'this' to the object through the object's constructor attribute.


Example 2:


      function Insect ()
      {
           this.bug = "bee";
           this.bugFood = function()
           {
               alert("nectar");
           }
       }

      var B = new Insect();
      alert(B.constructor); //displays "Insect"; By "The Rule of This" any
                            //ocurrence of 'this' inside Insect now refers 
                            //to B.    

To make this even clearer, we can create an Insect instance without using operator new.

Example 3:

   
    var C = {constructor:Insect};  //Assign the constructor attribute of C, 
                                   //the value Insect.
    C.constructor();               //Call Insect through the attribute. 
                                   //C is now an Insect instance as though it 
                                   //were created with operator new. [*]
    alert(C.bug);                  //Displays "bee." 
    C.bugFood();                   //Displays "nectar." 

[*] The only actual difference I can discern is that in example 3, 'constructor' is an enumerable attribute. When operator new is used 'constructor' becomes an attribute but is not enumerable. An attribute is enumerable if the for-in operation "for(var name in object)" returns the name of the attribute.

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You can bind a JavaScript object as a HTML element attribute.

<div id="jsTest">Klick Me</div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var someVariable = 'I was klicked';
    var divElement = document.getElementById('jsTest');
    // binding function/object or anything as attribute
    divElement.controller = function() { someVariable += '*'; alert('You can change instance data:\n' + someVariable ); };
    var onclickFunct = new Function( 'this.controller();' ); // Works in Firefox and Internet Explorer.
    divElement.onclick = onclickFunct;
</script>
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My first submission is not so much a hidden feature as a rarely used application of the property re-definition feature. Because you can redefine an object's methods, you can cache the result of a method call, which is useful if the calculation is expensive and you want lazy evaluation. This gives the simplest form of memoization.

function Circle(r) {
    this.setR(r);
}

Circle.prototype = {
  recalcArea: function() {
        this.area=function() {
            area = this.r * this.r * Math.PI;
            this.area = function() {return area;}
            return area;
        }
    },
  setR: function (r) {
      this.r = r;
      this.invalidateR();
    },
  invalidateR: function() {
        this.recalcArea();
    }
}

Refactor the code that caches the result into a method and you get:

Object.prototype.cacheResult = function(name, _get) {
  this[name] = function() {
    var result = _get.apply(this, arguments);
    this[name] = function() {
      return result;
    }
    return result;
  };
};

function Circle(r) {
    this.setR(r);
}

Circle.prototype = {
  recalcArea: function() {
        this.cacheResult('area', function() { return this.r * this.r * Math.PI; });
    },
  setR: function (r) {
      this.r = r;
      this.invalidateR();
    },
  invalidateR: function() {
        this.recalcArea();
    }
}

If you want a memoized function, you can have that instead. Property re-definition isn't involved.

Object.prototype.memoize = function(name, implementation) {
    this[name] = function() {
        var argStr = Array.toString.call(arguments);
        if (typeof(this[name].memo[argStr]) == 'undefined') {
            this[name].memo[argStr] = implementation.apply(this, arguments);
        }
        return this[name].memo[argStr];
    }
};

Note that this relies on the standard array toString conversion and often won't work properly. Fixing it is left as an exercise for the reader.

My second submission is getters and setters. I'm surprised they haven't been mentioned yet. Because the official standard differs from the de facto standard (defineProperty vs. define[GS]etter) and Internet Explorer barely supports the official standard, they aren't generally useful. Maybe that's why they weren't mentioned. Note that you can combine getters and result caching rather nicely:

Object.prototype.defineCacher = function(name, _get) {
    this.__defineGetter__(name, function() {
        var result = _get.call(this);
        this.__defineGetter__(name, function() { return result; });
        return result;
    })
};

function Circle(r) {
    this.r = r;
}

Circle.prototype = {
  invalidateR: function() {
        this.recalcArea();
    },
  recalcArea: function() {
        this.defineCacher('area', function() {return this.r * this.r * Math.PI; });
    },
  get r() { return this._r; }
  set r(r) { this._r = r; this.invalidateR(); }
}

var unit = new Circle(1);
unit.area;

Efficiently combining getters, setters and result caching is a little messier because you have to prevent the invalidation or do without automatic invalidation on set, which is what the following example does. It's mostly an issue if changing one property will invalidate multiple others (imagine there's a "diameter" property in these examples).

Object.prototype.defineRecalcer = function(name, _get) {
  var recalcFunc;
  this[recalcFunc='recalc'+name.toCapitalized()] = function() {
    this.defineCacher(name, _get);
  };
  this[recalcFunc]();
  this.__defineSetter__(name, function(value) {
      _set.call(this, value);
      this.__defineGetter__(name, function() {return value; });
  });
};

function Circle(r) {
    this.defineRecalcer('area',
             function() {return this.r * this.r * Math.PI;},
             function(area) {this._r = Math.sqrt(area / Math.PI);},
    );
    this.r = r;
}

Circle.prototype = {
  invalidateR: function() {
        this.recalcArea();
    },
  get r() { return this._r; }
  set r(r) { this._r = r; this.invalidateR(); }
}
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function can have methods.

I use this pattern of AJAX form submissions.

var fn = (function() {
		var ready = true;
		function fnX() {
			ready = false;
			// AJAX return function
			function Success() {
				ready = true;
			}
			Success();
			return "this is a test";
		}

		fnX.IsReady = function() {
			return ready;
		}
		return fnX;
	})();

	if (fn.IsReady()) {
		fn();
	}
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1  
This pattern is not hidden at all :) –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Dec 17 '09 at 15:14

Simple self-contained function return value caching:

function isRunningLocally(){
    var runningLocally = ....; // Might be an expensive check, check whatever needs to be checked.

    return (isRunningLocally = function(){
        return runningLocally;
    })();
},

The expensive part is only performed on the first call, and after that all the function does is return this value. Of course this is only useful for functions that will always return the same thing.

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Closures:

function f() { 
    var a; 
    function closureGet(){ return a; }
    function closureSet(val){ a=val;}
    return [closureGet,closureSet];
}

[closureGet,closureSet]=f(); 
closureSet(5);
alert(closureGet()); // gives 5

closureSet(15);
alert(closureGet()); // gives 15

The closure thing here is not the so-called destructuring assignment ([c,d] = [1,3] is equivalent to c=1; d=3;) but the fact that the occurences of a in closureGet and closureSet still refer to the same variable. Even after closureSet has assigned a a new value!

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When you are write callbacks you have a lot of code, which will look like this:

callback: function(){
  stuff(arg1,arg2);
}

You can use the function below, to make it somewhat cleaner.

callback: _(stuff, arg1, arg2) 

It uses a less well known function of the Function object of javascript, apply.

It also shows another character you can use as functionname: _.

function _(){
        var func;
        var args = new Array();
        for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++){
                if( i == 0){
                        func = arguments[i];
                } else {
                        args.push(arguments[i]);
                }
        }
        return function(){
                return func.apply(func, args);
        }
}
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2  
What's xfunction? A typo? –  Marcel Korpel Jun 24 '10 at 14:46

function l(f,n){n&&l(f,n-1,f(n));}

l( function( loop ){ alert( loop ); }, 5 );

alerts 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

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3  
It makes sense but...I would never employ you. –  user55776 Jul 13 '09 at 0:36

Well, it's not much of a feature, but it is very useful:

Shows selectable and formatted alerts:

alert(prompt('',something.innerHTML ));
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