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I'm wondering if this construction would be semantically correct in HTML5.

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <aside>
        <header>
            <h1></h1>
        </header>
        <div>

        </div>
    </aside>
    <section id="content">

    </section>
</body>
</html>

What I want is a left bar taking the 30% of the screen, with the logo and some stuff below it, and then the content taking the other 70% on the right side.

Thanks a lot.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There’s nothing wrong per se with the code you’ve put there, but bear in mind that the <aside> tag is a sectioning content element, so the <header> and <h1> inside it will be treated as the heading just for the <aside>, rather than for the whole page (at least under the HTML5 outlining algorithm, which, sadly, seems to be dead in practice).

That might be what you intend. If not, then if everything in the left column is pretty much just introductory content for the page, you could put it all inside a <header> element and lose the <aside> completely:

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <header>
        <h1></h1>
        <div>

        </div>
    </header>
    <section id="content">

    </section>
</body>
</html>
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1  
This is interesting, because of course, I want <header> to be the heading of the whole page. But at the same time I want to have it in a left column whit more content, which in this case is Google Maps Directions. So probably is better just to wrap the <header> and the <div id="directions"> within another <div> and not within <aside>. What do you think? –  Puigcerber May 24 '11 at 13:24
2  
@Pugicerber: yup, that sounds like a good idea. As I said, if you think the Google Maps Directions are introductory content for the page (which is obviously a subjective decision), they can happily live inside the <header> tag along with your <h1>. But if not, a <div> is the way to go to achieve the styling you want. –  Paul D. Waite May 24 '11 at 13:32

Given that HTML5 is still a draft, the specs says

A header element is intended to usually contain the section's heading (an h1–h6 element or an hgroup element), but this is not required. The header element can also be used to wrap a section's table of contents, a search form, or any relevant logos.

and

The [aside] element can be used for typographical effects like pull quotes or sidebars, for advertising, for groups of nav elements, and for other content that is considered separate from the main content of the page.

and the only "restriction" on the <aside /> tag is

It's not appropriate to use the aside element just for parentheticals, since those are part of the main flow of the document

event though there are no explicit examples with <header /> tags inside <aside /> tags, I would consider them OK.

Links:

  1. http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#the-header-element
  2. http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#the-aside-element
share|improve this answer
    
If the header in the aside is meant to be a header for the page though (instead of just for the aside element), then it shouldn’t be in the aside. –  Paul D. Waite May 24 '11 at 12:40
    
Hey @Albireo, what do you think of @paul-d-waite answer? –  Puigcerber May 24 '11 at 21:10
1  
@Puigcerber: He's right, it depends on what you want to do, if your header - as you're saying - refers to the whole page, you shouldn't put it in a <aside />. –  Albireo May 25 '11 at 7:36
    
Thanks to both for your answers. –  Puigcerber May 25 '11 at 10:04

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