Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to replace the current script tag with the HTML contents generated by the same script. That is, my Page is

 <html>
    <body>
       <div>
         <script src="myfile1.js"></script>
       </div>
       <div>
         <script src="myfile1.js"></script>
       </div>
    </body>
 </html>

Inside each .js file corresponding html contents are generated. I want to put the contents as the innerHTML of the parent div. But can't set id for the parent div because the page is not static. So the current script tag must be replaced with the HTML content. How can I do this?

For each script tag src is the same. So can't identify with src. These scripts displays some images with text randomly. Scripts are the same but displays different contents in divs on loading

Please help me

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try inside of myfile1.js:

var scripts = document.getElementsByTagName ( "script" );
var l = scripts.length;
for ( var i = 0; i < l; ++ i )
{
   if ( scripts [i].src = "myfile1.js" )
   {
      scripts [i].parentNode.innerHTML = "new content";
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
myfile1.js has already done what it needed to do at that point. You can just rip it out and expect anything to come with it. It won't remove global variables or un-document.write anything. –  John Green May 24 '11 at 10:50
    
edited. scripts [i].parentNode returns <div> tag. To change content You can use innerHTML or DOM functions. –  atlavis May 24 '11 at 10:59

This is a great question for those trying to implement a JSONP widget. The objective is to give the user the shortest possible amount of code.

The user prefers:

<script type="text/javscript" src="widget.js"></script>

Over:

<script type="text/javscript" src="widget.js"></script>
<div id="widget"></div>

Here's an example of how to achieve the first snippet:

TOP OF DOCUMENT<br />

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.4/jquery.min.js"></script>
// inside of widget.js
document.write('<div id="widget"></div>');
$(document).ready(function() {
    $.getJSON('http://test.com?remote_call=1', function(data) {
        $('#widget').html(data);
    });
});

<br />BOTTOM OF DOCUMENT

Have a look at: http://alexmarandon.com/articles/web_widget_jquery/ for the correct way to include a library inside of a script.

share|improve this answer

Unfortunately a running JavaScript file is not aware of where it is running. If you use document.write() in the script, the write function will take place wherever the script runs, which would be one way to accomplish what you want, but without replacing the contents or being able to perform any actions on the enclosing DIV.

I can't really envisage a situation where you'd have such stringent restrictions on building a page - surely if the page is dynamic you could generate identifiers for your DIV elements, or load content in a more traditional manner?

share|improve this answer

Why not use Smarty?

http://www.smarty.net/

You can use javascript in Smarty templates, or just use built-in functions.

Just take a look at http://www.smarty.net/crash_course

share|improve this answer

poof -- old answer gone.

Based on your last edit, here's what you want to do:

 <html>
    <head>
        <!-- I recommend getting this from Google Ajax Libraries
             You don't need this, but it makes my answer way shorter -->
        <script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
          $(document).ready(function(){
             function getRandomContent(){
              // I expect this is the contents of your current script file.
              // just package it into a function.
              var rnd = Math.random();
              return "[SomeHtml]";
             }
             $('.random').each(idx, el){
                 $(this).html(getRandomHtmlContent());
             });
          });
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
       <div class="random">
       </div>
       <div class="random">
       </div>
    </body>
 </html>
share|improve this answer

If you don't mind leaving the script tag you can use something as simple as document.write from within the scripts.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll un-downvote you if you provide some sort of code. Either I don't quite understand what you're saying, or it has no relevance here. Sorry, apparently this question has me being persnickety. I think the idea of building a site this way just pissed me off. –  John Green May 24 '11 at 10:58
    
I think he means that, if you have <div><script src="s.js"></script></div> and s.js file is document.write("<p>new content</p>") you'll get <div><p>new content</p></div> - quite simple –  atlavis May 24 '11 at 11:04
    
@John Green - PageSpike: Sir, the idea is so basic that I don't think it requires any code. When you want a script to render something exactly where you place it, let alone the reasons for such requirement, document.write is just the way to go. Anyway there is exactly the same suggestion in a post below. For the sake of your own consistency please downvote it too. –  rciq May 24 '11 at 11:05
    
@John: Nope, it's still there. Obviously everyone can see where you're coming from with such boolean hatred for document.write. I could say I come from a place near you, however I'm pretty sure you neither understand the question, nor the solution, nor the way it's equivalent to finding script's own parent and appending html to it. Personally I don't care getting downvotes, however I can only hope you won't cause too much harm to those newbie people who actually believe you and your random superstitious comments. –  rciq May 24 '11 at 11:31
    
The only post below is one about Smarty. I think I get the solution, since was modifed ex post facto be a veritable clone of my own. My goal in being here is to help people. That doesn't necessarily mean coddling them with the line of code they need, because there's more to it than that. I took issue with your code, because it seemed that was what the author was attempting to do in the first place, which was really what I had a problem with in the first place. But I digress... I've been over the top, and I apologize. –  John Green May 24 '11 at 11:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.