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I just want to flip a boolean based on what it already is. If it's true - make it false. If it's false - make it true.

Here is my code excerpt:

switch(wParam) {

case VK_F11:
  if (flipVal == true) {
     flipVal = false;
  } else {
    flipVal = true;
  }
break;

case VK_F12:
  if (otherVal == true) {
     otherValVal = false;
  } else {
    otherVal = true;
  }
break;

default:
break;
}
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12 Answers 12

Easiest solution that I found:

x ^= true;
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flipVal ^= 1;

same goes for

otherVal
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Just because my favorite odd ball way to toggle a bool is not listed...

bool x = true;
x = x == false;

works too. :)

(yes the x = !x; is clearer and easier to read)

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This seems to be a free-for-all ... Heh. Here's another varation, which I guess is more in the category "clever" than something I'd recommend for production code:

flipVal ^= (wParam == VK_F11);
otherVal ^= (wParam == VK_F12);

I guess it's advantages are:

  • Very terse
  • Does not require branching

And a just as obvious disadvantage is

  • Very terse

This is close to @korona's solution using ?: but taken one (small) step further.

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By order of operations, I think you can omit the parenthesis for even more terse. :O –  Drew Sep 29 '11 at 14:50

Clearly you need a flexible solution that can support types masquerading as boolean. The following allows for that:

template<typename T>    bool Flip(const T& t);

You can then specialize this for different types that might pretend to be boolean. For example:

template<>  bool Flip<bool>(const bool& b)  { return !b; }
template<>  bool Flip<int>(const int& i)    { return !(i == 0); }

An example of using this construct:

if(Flip(false))  { printf("flipped false\n"); }
if(!Flip(true))  { printf("flipped true\n"); }

if(Flip(0))  { printf("flipped 0\n"); }
if(!Flip(1)) { printf("flipped 1\n"); }

No, I'm not serious.

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Just for information - if instead of an integer your required field is a single bit within a larger type, use the 'xor' operator instead:

int flags;

int flag_a = 0x01;
int flag_b = 0x02;
int flag_c = 0x04;

/* I want to flip 'flag_b' without touching 'flag_a' or 'flag_c' */
flags ^= flag_b;

/* I want to set 'flag_b' */
flags |= flag_b;

/* I want to clear (or 'reset') 'flag_b' */
flags &= ~flag_b;

/* I want to test 'flag_b' */
int b_is_set = (flags & flab_b) != 0;
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Clearly you need a factory pattern!

KeyFactory keyFactory = new KeyFactory();
KeyObj keyObj = keyFactory.getKeyObj(wParam);
keyObj.doStuff();


class VK_F11 extends KeyObj {
   boolean val;
   public void doStuff() {
      val = !val;
   }
}

class VK_F12 extends KeyObj {
   boolean val;
   public void doStuff() {
      val = !val;
   }
}

class KeyFactory {
   public KeyObj getKeyObj(int param) {
      switch(param) {
         case VK_F11:
            return new VK_F11();
         case VK_F12:
            return new VK_F12();
      }
      throw new KeyNotFoundException("Key " + param + " was not found!");
   }
}

:D

</sarcasm>
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2  
Hahahahaha. ROFL. –  Austin Mar 4 '09 at 18:26
1  
We could probably add in the singleton pattern for the factory too. –  Drew Mar 4 '09 at 21:56
    
Oh God why am I laughing so hard? –  Orm Jan 11 '10 at 22:50
8  
+1 for a creative (and hilarious) anti-solution. –  Jough Dempsey Mar 30 '10 at 16:14
1  
Note the subtle recommendation to switch to Java! –  Mechanical snail Dec 19 '12 at 16:38

If you know the values are 0 or 1, you could do flipval ^= 1.

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1  
Why use a bitwise operator for a logical operation? Smells of needless obfuscation to me. –  Mark Pim Mar 4 '09 at 17:18
2  
@Mark: Sorry. Guess I'm old-fashioned. But it does help if your L-value expression is really long, so you don't have to repeat it. Also, you could say flipval ^= TRUE. Is that better? –  Mike Dunlavey Mar 4 '09 at 17:52
    
@Mark - see my posting - because sometimes your logical values are stored in bits. Not everyone wants to waste a whole 8 bits (or more) just for a boolean. –  Alnitak Mar 6 '09 at 9:17
4  
@Alnitak: You're right in some circumstances. I have seen some people pack bits together to "save space" and act as if the instructions to access them didn't take any space. –  Mike Dunlavey Mar 6 '09 at 12:39
    
I'm confused as to how this would work... If my value is 0 (false) and I say myVal ^= 1 wouldn't that be myVal = 0^1 which is still 0 and if my value is 1 (true) and I say myVal ^= 1 wouldn't that be myVal = 1^1 which is still 1? How does this flip the BOOL value? –  Albert Renshaw Nov 11 '13 at 19:53
up vote 191 down vote accepted
+500

You can flip a value like so:

myVal = !myVal;

so your code would shorten down to:

switch(wParam) {
    case VK_F11:
    flipVal = !flipVal;
    break;

    case VK_F12:
    otherVal = !otherVal;
    break;

    default:
    break;
}
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1  
Not only this is the easiest, but also the cleanest way. –  sharptooth Mar 4 '09 at 14:58
1  
I use this Boolean "toggle" all the time in code. –  Jim C Mar 4 '09 at 15:01
10  
It's always the easiest questions that get such intense rep :P –  zildjohn01 Mar 4 '09 at 15:18
3  
Default: break; is unnecessary. –  Rob K Mar 6 '09 at 15:52
2  
If you're toggling something long-winded like object1->system1.system2.system3.parameter1 then it can be helpful to have a TOGGLE(a) macro. This prevents some mistakes and makes it all more readable on narrow screens. –  OJW Oct 1 '10 at 12:17

I prefer John T's solution, but if you want to go all code-golfy, your statement logically reduces to this:

//if key is down, toggle the boolean, else leave it alone.
flipVal = ((wParam==VK_F11) && !flipVal) || (!(wParam==VK_F11) && flipVal);
if(wParam==VK_F11) Break;

//if key is down, toggle the boolean, else leave it alone.
otherVal = ((wParam==VK_F12) && !otherVal) || (!(wParam==VK_F12) && otherVal);
if(wParam==VK_F12) Break;
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Don't you have to check wParam against VK_F11 and VK_F12? –  drby Mar 4 '09 at 15:44
    
Doh! Yes, thank you... I've made that edit. –  JosephStyons Mar 4 '09 at 16:46

The codegolf'ish solution would be more like:

flipVal = (wParam == VK_F11) ? !flipVal : flipVal;
otherVal = (wParam == VK_F12) ? !otherVal : otherVal;
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4  
Well if we're going to codegolf: flipVal= (wParam==VK_F11)!=flipVal;... –  bobince Mar 4 '09 at 16:23
    
ok, you guys win... :) I was never much of a golfer anyway. –  JosephStyons Mar 4 '09 at 16:48

Also

if (otherVal == true)

is equivalent to

if(otherVal)

As John T showed, you don't need it here. Just figured I'd point it out.

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it´s dirty but not secure.... it checks only if otherVal is set but not clearly if (true/false) –  Mirko Brunner May 12 at 15:13

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