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How can I be sure that my result set will have a first and b second? It would help me to solve a tricky ordering problem.

Here is a simplified example of what I'm doing:

SELECT a FROM A LIMIT 1 
UNION 
SELECT b FROM B LIMIT 1;
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1  
@tharkun : I realize you don't like RichB, but realize what your question looks like on the main page if the only two lines you see are SQL code, and not the question. That's why he edited it the way he did, and frankly, his edit made the question look much better. –  George Stocker Mar 12 '09 at 18:49
    
@tharkun : Separate his 'harsh' tone from his edits. They are separate. He sure is stark in his language; but that doesn't make his edits any less valid. –  George Stocker Mar 12 '09 at 19:16
    
@tharkun: Please try and leave your personal feelings for me aside and do what is right for the community. You are being ridiculous. –  GEOCHET Mar 12 '09 at 19:17
    
So because you don't like Rich you're going to overwrite a perfectly valid edit that you yourself admit is useful? –  TheTXI Mar 12 '09 at 19:18
    
Rolled back to Rich's edits. Not siding with anyone or anything other than the quality of the question. –  Jon B Mar 12 '09 at 19:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 25 down vote accepted
SELECT col
FROM 
   (
       SELECT a col, 0 ordinal FROM A LIMIT 1
       UNION ALL
       SELECT b, 1 FROM B LIMIT 1
   ) t
ORDER BY ordinal
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that seems to be the pro+ version of what Dana suggests, thanks! –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:17
    
is that, if I don't want the ordinal in the result set, right?! –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:23
    
and what's the lonely 't' doing in line 7? –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:25
1  
Correct: the difference here is that it hides the ordinal. The 't' gives the derived table a name- you could use anything you want, but since we're not using it elsewhere the actual value isn't important. But it won't compile without something there. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 4 '09 at 15:28
    
wonderful, that's exactly what I need! –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:29

I don't think order is guaranteed, at least not across all DBMS.

What I've done in the past to control the ordering in UNIONs is:

(SELECT a, 0 AS Foo FROM A LIMIT 1)
UNION
(SELECT b, 1 AS Foo FROM B LIMIT 1)
ORDER BY Foo
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oh, that's brilliant, easy and brilliant! –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:09
    
Are you sure that order by will not be applied only to the last query in the union? –  Kjetil Watnedal Mar 4 '09 at 15:26
    
@Kjetil: actually you're right, there have to be brackets –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:28
    
Ahh, in SQL Server the ORDER BY applies to the results of the UNION, and not just the second sub-query. –  Dana Mar 4 '09 at 16:21
    
ok, with mysql it's different. –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 16:23

No, the order of results in a SQL query is controlled only by the ORDER BY clause. It may be that you happen to see ordered results without an ORDER BY clause in some situation, but that is by chance (e.g. a side-effect of the optimiser's current query plan) and not guaranteed.

What is the tricky ordering problem?

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thanks, I thought so... the tricky ordering problem, if it remainds tricky will be the content of another question which I would link here. –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:08

I know for Oracle there is no way to guarantee which will come out first without an order by. The problem is if you try it it may come out in the correct order even for most of the times you run it. But as soon as you rely on it in production, it will come out wrong.

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I would have thought not, since the database would most likely need to do an ORDER BY in order to the UNION.

UNION ALL might behave differently, but YMMV.

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UNION ALL simply guarantees that all records are returned. A simple UNION filters duplicates. –  Dana Mar 4 '09 at 15:16

Your result set with UNION will eliminate distinct values.

I can't find any proof in documentation, but from 10 years experience I can tell that UNION ALL does preserve order, at least in Oracle.

Do not rely on this, however, if you're building a nuclear plant or something like that.

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2  
yes, I'm building a nuclear power plant! ;) –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:14

The short answer is yes, you will get A then B.

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and what's the long answer, given that everybody else says the opposite? –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:12
    
The long answer would be that without an ORDER BY clause, you are going to get FIFO based upon the UNION clause. For instance, Table B specified first in the UNION would yeild, B->A. UNION does not involve any sorting behavior in and of itself. –  Bill Mar 4 '09 at 15:24
    
ppl don't seem to agree with you, can you prove your claim? –  markus Mar 4 '09 at 15:32
    
create table #A (A VARCHAR(10)) create table #B (B VARCHAR(10)) INSERT INTO #A(A) VALUES('A') INSERT INTO #A(A) VALUES('AA') INSERT INTO #A(A) VALUES('AAA') INSERT INTO #B(B) VALUES('B') INSERT INTO #B(B) VALUES('BB') INSERT INTO #B(B) VALUES('BBB') SELECT a from #A UNION SELECT b FROM #B; –  Bill Mar 4 '09 at 15:38
1  
DBs in general do not guarantee any order for returned results unless a specific order is requested. Coming up with an example that seems to work in some cases does not guarantee that it will always work. –  Beska Mar 4 '09 at 16:01

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