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This helpful article from David Haydn shows how you can use the InjectionConstructor class to help you set up a chain using the decorator pattern with Unity. However, if the items in your decorator chain have other parameters in their constructor, the InjectionConstructor must explicitly declare each one of them (or Unity will complain that it can't find the right constructor). This means that you can't simply add new constructor parameters to items in the decorator chain without also updating your Unity configuration code.

Here's some example code to explain what I mean. The ProductRepository class is wrapped first by CachingProductRepository and then by LoggingProductRepostiory. Both CachingProductRepository and LoggingProductRepository, in addition to taking a IProductRepository in their constructor, also need other interfaces from the container.

    public class Product 
    {
        public int Id;
        public string Name;
    }

    public interface IDatabaseConnection { }

    public interface ICacheProvider 
    { 
        object GetFromCache(string key);
        void AddToCache(string key, object value);
    }

    public interface ILogger
    {
        void Log(string message, params object[] args);
    }


    public interface IProductRepository
    {
        Product GetById(int id);    
    }

    class ProductRepository : IProductRepository
    {
        public ProductRepository(IDatabaseConnection db)
        {
        }

        public Product GetById(int id)
        {
            return new Product() { Id = id, Name = "Foo " + id.ToString() };
        }
    }

    class CachingProductRepository : IProductRepository
    {
        IProductRepository repository;
        ICacheProvider cacheProvider;
        public CachingProductRepository(IProductRepository repository, ICacheProvider cp)
        {
            this.repository = repository;
            this.cacheProvider = cp;
        }

        public Product GetById(int id)
        {       
            string key = "Product " + id.ToString();
            Product p = (Product)cacheProvider.GetFromCache(key);
            if (p == null)
            {
                p = repository.GetById(id);
                cacheProvider.AddToCache(key, p);
            }
            return p;
        }
    }

    class LoggingProductRepository : IProductRepository
    {
        private IProductRepository repository;
        private ILogger logger;

        public LoggingProductRepository(IProductRepository repository, ILogger logger)
        {
            this.repository = repository;
            this.logger = logger;
        }

        public Product GetById(int id)
        {
            logger.Log("Requesting product {0}", id);
            return repository.GetById(id);
        }
    }

Here's a (passing) unit test. See the comments for the bits of surplus configuration I want to remove the need for:

    [Test]
    public void ResolveWithDecorators()
    {
        UnityContainer c = new UnityContainer();            
        c.RegisterInstance<IDatabaseConnection>(new Mock<IDatabaseConnection>().Object);
        c.RegisterInstance<ILogger>(new Mock<ILogger>().Object);
        c.RegisterInstance<ICacheProvider>(new Mock<ICacheProvider>().Object);

        c.RegisterType<IProductRepository, ProductRepository>("ProductRepository");

        // don't want to have to update this line every time the CachingProductRepository constructor gets another parameter
        var dependOnProductRepository = new InjectionConstructor(new ResolvedParameter<IProductRepository>("ProductRepository"), new ResolvedParameter<ICacheProvider>());
        c.RegisterType<IProductRepository, CachingProductRepository>("CachingProductRepository", dependOnProductRepository);

        // don't want to have to update this line every time the LoggingProductRepository constructor changes
        var dependOnCachingProductRepository = new InjectionConstructor(new ResolvedParameter<IProductRepository>("CachingProductRepository"), new ResolvedParameter<ILogger>());
        c.RegisterType<IProductRepository, LoggingProductRepository>(dependOnCachingProductRepository);
        Assert.IsInstanceOf<LoggingProductRepository>(c.Resolve<IProductRepository>());
    }
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2  
well, i never used unity before and maybe this is way off, but can't you use injectionfactory instead of injectionconstructor? –  DarkSquirrel42 May 24 '11 at 12:18
    
@DarkSquirrel42 an interesting suggestion. The Action would presumably have to call the concrete constructor though, meaning that the Unity configuration code would still need to be called whenever the construtor changed. It would at least result in a compile error though, alerting you to the need for change. –  Mark Heath May 24 '11 at 12:45
    
@DarkSquirrel42, on second thoughts, if you just use a single InjectionFactory whose Func builds the whole chain, using the container to fulfil other dependencies, although you are still not isolated from constructor parameter changes, is at least much less confusing than my original code, and requires only one registration in the container as well. –  Mark Heath May 24 '11 at 12:53
    
link to article is broken –  Josh Noe Aug 28 '13 at 20:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Another approach, thanks to a suggestion from @DarkSquirrel42, is to use an InjectionFactory. The downside is that the code still needs updating every time a new constructor parameter is added to something in the chain. The advantages are much easier to understand code, and only a single registration into the container.

Func<IUnityContainer,object> createChain = container =>
    new LoggingProductRepository(
        new CachingProductRepository(
            container.Resolve<ProductRepository>(), 
            container.Resolve<ICacheProvider>()), 
        container.Resolve<ILogger>());

c.RegisterType<IProductRepository>(new InjectionFactory(createChain));
Assert.IsInstanceOf<LoggingProductRepository>(c.Resolve<IProductRepository>());
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4  
This also has the advantage that changes to the constructors will generate compile time instead of runtime errors. –  Peter Ruderman Aug 23 '11 at 14:19

See this article on implementing a decorator container extension. This should get you to where you want to be with regards to not needing to modify your configuration if your constructor signatures change.

share|improve this answer
    
This is my favourite solution! –  Jan Jul 24 at 13:10

While I was waiting for answers on this, I came up with a rather hacky workaround. I've created an extension method on IUnityContainer that lets me register a decorator chain using reflection to create the InjectionConstructor parameters:

static class DecoratorUnityExtensions
{
    public static void RegisterDecoratorChain<T>(this IUnityContainer container, Type[] decoratorChain)
    {
        Type parent = null;
        string parentName = null;
        foreach (Type t in decoratorChain)
        {
            string namedInstance = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
            if (parent == null)
            {
                // top level, just do an ordinary register type                    
                container.RegisterType(typeof(T), t, namedInstance);
            }
            else
            {
                // could be cleverer here. Just take first constructor
                var constructor = t.GetConstructors()[0];
                var resolvedParameters = new List<ResolvedParameter>();
                foreach (var constructorParam in constructor.GetParameters())
                {
                    if (constructorParam.ParameterType == typeof(T))
                    {
                        resolvedParameters.Add(new ResolvedParameter<T>(parentName));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        resolvedParameters.Add(new ResolvedParameter(constructorParam.ParameterType));
                    }
                }
                if (t == decoratorChain.Last())
                {
                    // not a named instance
                    container.RegisterType(typeof(T), t, new InjectionConstructor(resolvedParameters.ToArray()));
                }
                else
                {
                    container.RegisterType(typeof(T), t, namedInstance, new InjectionConstructor(resolvedParameters.ToArray()));
                }
            }
            parent = t;
            parentName = namedInstance;
        }
    }
}

This allows me to configure my container with a much more readable syntax:

[Test]
public void ResolveWithDecorators2()
{
    UnityContainer c = new UnityContainer();
    c.RegisterInstance<IDatabaseConnection>(new Mock<IDatabaseConnection>().Object);
    c.RegisterInstance<ILogger>(new Mock<ILogger>().Object);
    c.RegisterInstance<ICacheProvider>(new Mock<ICacheProvider>().Object);

    c.RegisterDecoratorChain<IProductRepository>(new Type[] { typeof(ProductRepository), typeof(CachingProductRepository), typeof(LoggingProductRepository) });

    Assert.IsInstanceOf<LoggingProductRepository>(c.Resolve<IProductRepository>());

}

I'd still be interested to know if there is a more elegant solution to this with Unity

share|improve this answer

The most elegant solution I could come up with involves adding type parameters to your code base in order to help Unity resolving your types. Luckily Unity is perfectly capable of resolving them and their dependencies on its own, so we don't have to care about constructor parameters when defining the decorator chain.

The registration would look as follows:

unityContainer.RegisterType<IService, LoggedService<ProfiledService<Service>>>();

Here is a basic example implementation. Note the templated decorators LoggedService<T> and ProfiledService<T>. Look below for some drawbacks I've noticed so far.

public interface IService
{
    void Do();
}

public class Service : IService
{
    public void Do() { }
}

public class LoggedService<T> : IService 
    where T : IService
{
    private T decoratee;
    private ILogger logger;

    public LoggedService(ILogger logger, T decoratee)
    {
        this.decoratee = decoratee;
        this.logger = logger;
    }

    public void Do()
    {
        logger.Debug("Do()");
        decoratee.Do();
    }
}

public class ProfiledService<T> : IService
    where T : IService
{
    private T decoratee;
    private IProfiler profiler;

    public ProfiledService(IProfiler profiler, T decoratee)
    {
        this.decoratee = decoratee;
        this.profiler = profiler;
    }

    public void Do()
    {
        profiler.Start();
        decoratee.Do();
        profiler.Stop();
    }
}

Drawbacks

  • A faulty registration like uC.RegisterType<ISvc, LogSvc<ISvc>>(); will result in an infinite recursion that stack-overflows your application. This can be a serious vulnerability in a plug-in architecture!
  • It uglyfies your code base to some degree. If you ever give up Unity and switch to a different DI framework those template parameters will make no sense to anyone anymore.
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