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I'm trying to build a table-like layout with 2 columns where only some (few of) the cells have actually any data. About 50%-75% of the "cells" are gonna be blank/not existant, so I would like to accomplish this using divs if possible.

For example, for the following HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="left">
        <div class="p1">l1</div>
        <div class="p3">l3</div>
        <div class="p4">l4</div>
        <div class="p5">l5</div>
    </div>
    <div id="right">
        <div class="p1">r1</div>
        <div class="p2">r2</div>
        <div class="p3">r3</div>
        <div class="p5">r5</div>
    </div>
</div>

"Cell" l1 should be at the same vertical position as r1, l3 as r3, l5 as r5, like this:

l1 r1
   r2
l3 r3
l4
l5 r5

I've been unable to accomplish this, so far I've tried:

  • wrapper with position:relative, "cells" with position:absolute and positioning them with top: xxpx;
  • floats

But nothing is working for me. Is there any way of doing this without actually filling in all the div "cells", even if they are blank? That would really be like using a table, which is the only solution that is working for me at the moment.

share|improve this question
1  
Which browsers do you need to support? Are the cells fixed width/height, or not? Could you add a jsFiddle test case with some kind of code? (if only to make it easier to understand what you're trying to do) – thirtydot May 24 '11 at 12:00
    
http://jsfiddle.net/joseluisbolos/9Ae9e/ @thirtydot This is an example where the cells are correctly situated height-wise, but both columns are collapsed to the left. Also, the wrapper height doesn't span to the height of the cells because of position: absolute; Cells will be fixed width and height (although for simplicity they are not in the example). Latest browsers. – José Luis May 24 '11 at 12:17
    
I hate to raise that age-old debate, but this is --TABULAR-- layout. There's a reason for Tables, and this is it, my friend. – bpeterson76 May 24 '11 at 14:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Latest browsers. – José Luis 8 mins ago

Cool. In that case, I'm going to suggest display: table-cell and friends.

It won't work in IE7, but that won't be a problem if you only care about the latest browsers.

I don't particularly like the "divitus", but there's little that can be done about it.

JSFiddle

CSS

#wrapper { 
    border: solid 1px #0f0; 
    display: table 
}
#wrapper > div { 
    border: solid 1px #00f; 
    display: table-row 
}
#wrapper > div > div { 
    border: solid 1px #f00; 
    display: table-cell 
}

HTML

<div id="wrapper">
    <div>
        <div>l1</div>
        <div>r1</div>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div></div>
        <div>r2</div>
    </div>
    ..
</div>

Cells will be fixed width and height

In that case, you can also consider something simpler, and closer to what you originally had:

JSFiddle

CSS

#wrapper { 
    border: solid 1px #0f0; 
    background: #ccc; 
    float: left 
}
#left { 
    border: solid 1px #00f; 
    float: left 
}
#right { 
    border: solid 1px #f00; 
    float: left }
#left > div, #right > div {
    border: solid 1px #000;
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px
}

HTML

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="left">
        <div>l1</div>
        <div></div>
        ..
    </div>

    <div id="right">
        <div>r1</div>
        <div>r2</div>
        ..
    </div>
</div>

A third idea, specifically catering to:

I was trying to avoid the <div></div> thingy

You can omit empty cells now.

Personally, I'd rather just put up with having empty divs, because this is a little complicated.

I commented out rather than remove the "empty cells".

JSFiddle

CSS

#wrapper {
    border: solid 1px #0f0;
    background: #ccc;
    float: left;
    width: 100px
}
#wrapper > div {
    outline: solid 1px #000;
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px
}

.l {
    float: left
}
.r {
    float: right;
}
.r + .r + .l {
    clear: right;
    background: red
}
.l + .l {
    clear: left;
    background: blue
}
.r + .r + .r {
    clear: right;
    background: #666
}

HTML

<div id="wrapper">
    <div class="l">l1</div>
    <div class="r">r1</div>

    <!--<div class="l">l2</div>-->
    <div class="r">r2</div>

    <div class="l">l3</div>
    <div class="r">r3</div>

    <div class="l">l4</div>
    <!--<div class="r">r4</div>-->

    <div class="l">l5</div>
    <div class="r">r5</div>

    <!--<div class="l">l6</div>-->
    <div class="r">r6</div>

    <!--<div class="l">l7</div>-->
    <div class="r">r7</div>

    <div class="l">l8</div>
    <div class="r">r8</div>

    <div class="l">l9</div>
    <!--<div class="r">r9</div>-->

    <div class="l">l10</div>
    <!--<div class="r">r10</div>-->

    <div class="l">l11</div>
    <div class="r">r11</div>
</div>

This should be a reasonably extensive HTML test case.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, both suggestions work perfectly. However, as most of the cells are going to be blank (only about 25% actually filled with data) I was trying to avoid the <div></div> thingy which basically would be the same as actually using a table. – José Luis May 24 '11 at 12:45
    
I added a third candidate to my answer. – thirtydot May 24 '11 at 14:00
    
It turned out that third candidate was a little buggy. Try this version: jsbin.com/ezeju3 - and make sure you test extensively before saying you're happy with it :) – thirtydot May 24 '11 at 14:33
    
I will try it and then I will decide if it's worth not using tables, because apparently in this case the simple solution (using a table) appears to be the best. Thanks :) – José Luis May 24 '11 at 17:13
    
I seem to have spent a silly amount of time on this question, but here's yet another choice: jsfiddle.net/9Ae9e/8 - it's much less complex than the idea in my last comment, at the expense of an extra wrapper div per row. Though you can still omit the blank "cells". – thirtydot May 24 '11 at 17:35

I thought this might be a nice compliment to thirtydot's answer.

It leverages angular's ng-repeat, here's the JSFiddle, based off of his work.

CSS

#wrapper {
    border: solid 1px #0f0;
    background: #ccc;
    float: left;
    width: 100px
}
#wrapper > div {
    outline: solid 1px #000;
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px
}
.l {
    float: left
}
.r {
    float: right;
}
.r + .r + .l {
    clear: right;
}
.l + .l {
    clear: left;
}
.r + .r + .r {
    clear: right;
}

NB: No change here

HTML

<div id="wrapper" ng-controller="MainCtrl">
    <div ng-repeat="item in items track by item.order" ng-class="{l:item.order%2!=0,r:item.order%2==0}">{{item.id}}</div>
</div>

I was hoping to use ng-class-odd but that always works off of $index regardless of the tracking.

JS

var app = angular.module("app", []); app.controller("MainCtrl", function ($scope) {

    $scope.items = [{
        id: 1,
        order: 1
    }, {
        id: 2,
        order: 2
    }, {
        id: 3,
        order: 3
    }, {
        id: 4,
        order: 7
    }, {
        id: 5,
        order: 9
    }, {
        id: 6,
        order: 10
    }, {
        id: 7,
        order: 12
    }, {
        id: 8,
        order: 14
    }, {
        id: 9,
        order: 16
    }, {
        id: 10,
        order: 17
    }, {
        id: 11,
        order: 18
    }];


});

In reality, your data will be more complex an likely come from a $rest or $resource

Hope this helps anyone trying to do this in angular.

share|improve this answer
    
This question is completely unrelated to AngularJS. – José Luis Apr 9 '15 at 16:53
    
@Joséluis I know, but when I found your question (looking for how to do this in angular) I had to figure it out. Now someone else in my position won't have to. – Pureferret Apr 9 '15 at 16:58
    
That doesn't make it a valid answer for this question, at all. – José Luis Apr 10 '15 at 13:52
    
@JoséLuis feel free to flag and/or downvote :) – Pureferret Apr 10 '15 at 14:04
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – Stephen Muecke Apr 11 '15 at 2:32

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