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In this code:

public bool SomeMethod(out List<Task> tasks)
{
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Process.Start(info));
    tasks.Add(task);
}

I get an error, "Use of unassigned out parameter 'tasks'". Why?

In an MSDN example there's just use of out parameter

class OutExample
{
    static void Method(out int i)
    {
        i = 44;
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        int value;
        Method(out value);
        // value is now 44
    }
}

Is it because of List<T>?

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have to initialize the out parameter in the method body (that is create a new List<Task> instance and assign it to the out parameter):

public bool SomeMethod(out List<Task> tasks) {
  var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Process.Start(info);
  tasks = new List<Task>() { task };
  ...
}

I'm using the collection initializer syntax to add the task to the list, but you could call the Add method instead if you prefer.

You should call the method like this:

List<Task> tasks;
SomeMethod(out tasks);
var newTask = tasks[0]; // Access the task just created.

If you really want to create the list before calling the method simply remove the out:

public bool SomeMethod(List<Task> tasks) {
  var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Process.Start(info);
  tasks.Add(task);
  ...
}

And call it like this:

var tasks = new List<Task>();
SomeMethod(tasks);
var newTask = tasks[0]; // Access the task just created.

In general it is good practice to avoid out parameters because they can be confusing.

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And after exiting SomeMethod original 'tasks' will have items from this SomeMethod? I ask because there are many threads in this moment, not all working properly so I can not verify it –  Saint May 24 '11 at 14:22
    
I can't pass by value because I need to pick up all the 'task' at a higher class –  Saint May 24 '11 at 14:23
    
There's no such thing as passing List<T> by value. It's a reference type, not a value type. –  Joel Mueller May 24 '11 at 19:10
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out means that your method needs to create the object, then assign it to the parameter:

List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
tasks.Add(task);
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Isn't declaring it enough? (Given that you'll initialize it in the method.) e.g. List<Task> myTask = null; –  Albireo May 24 '11 at 13:46
    
Setting tasks = null; would remove the compiler error regarding the initialization, but you'd get a runtime error on tasks.Add(task); –  takrl May 24 '11 at 13:57
    
No, you need to set it. That's what out means. –  John Saunders May 24 '11 at 14:00
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It's because you didn't assign a value to the tasks-variable... in this case that would be a reference to a instance of type List<Task>.

Add tasks = new List<Task>(); to the body of SomeMethod and everything will work fine:

public bool SomeMethod(out List<Task> tasks) {
   tasks = new List<Task>();
   var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Process.Start(info);
   tasks.Add(task);
}
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You need to initialise the tasks parameter. e.g. tasks = new List<Task>()

This thread discusses the use of out and ref with parameters. If you use the ref keyword then you must have set the value prior to calling the method. I see no reason to use the ref keyword in this case though

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You need to do tasks = new List<Task>(); before you can add a Task object to it. MSDN has an example that is closer to what you're doing, this passes an array rather than an int.

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