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I need some advice here, I hope somebody can help me. I have the following class structure (simplified):

public class Bar: IDisposable {...}

public abstract class FooBase: IDisposable
{
    Bar bar;
    bool disposed;

    internal FooBase(Bar bar)
    {
        this.bar=bar;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
         Dispose(true);
         GC.SupressFinalize(this);

    }

    protected void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
         if (!this.disposed)
         {
             if (disposing)
             {
                 this.bar.Dispose();
             }

             this.disposed = true;
         }
    }
}

public FooA: Foo {...}
public FooB: Foo {...}

public static class FooProvider
{
    public static FooA GetFooA()
    {
       Bar bar = new Bar();
       ...
       return new FooA(bar);
    }

    public static FooB GetFooB()
    {
        Bar bar = new Bar();
        ...
        return new FooB(bar);
    }

    ...
}

When I run Code Analysis on this, I get Warnings CA2000 on all 'CreateFooX()' methods of the FooProvider class. This warning gives the following message:

"Microsoft. Reliability: In method 'FooProvider.GetFooX()', call System.IDisposable.Dispose on object 'bar' before all references to it are out of scope."

Microsoft recommends to never suppress this warning but I'm not really sure its warning about a real problem in the code. True that 'bar' is not disposed before going out of scope in whatever 'CreateFooX()' method we consider but a reference to it lives on in the 'FooX' object which eventually will get disposed and will in turn take care of disposing 'bar'.

Am I understanding something wrong about how the Dispose pattern should work and I have some fundamental flaw in my code or should I just suppress this warning?

EDIT

Due to some comments I tried modifying the factory methods to the following:

public static class FooProvider
{
    public static FooA GetFooA()
    {
       Bar bar = null;

       try
       {
           bar =  new Bar();
           ...
           return new FooA(bar);
       }
       catch
       {
           if (bar != null) bar.Dispose();
           throw;
       }
    }

    ...
}

But I still get the same warning. I guess its just a false positive and I'm safe ingoring it.

Thanks for any advice.

share|improve this question
    
Don't know whether you've omitted it for brevity, but don't forget to include a finalizer in FooBase to actually call Dispose should it not be called explicity in code. –  Massif May 24 '11 at 14:46
    
Yeah, I omitted it. Thanks for the reminder though. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 14:49
    
@Massif, @InBetween: If FooBase only ever deals with managed resources, and doesn't directly handle any unmanaged resources, then a finalizer should be completely unnecessary. –  LukeH May 24 '11 at 15:30
    
@LukeH: You are absolutely right. I should have pointed out that it does deal with unmanaged resources but it's not directly related to the question so I didn't mention it. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 15:48
    
I also hate this false positive, and opened a ticket here: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/779134. Vote it up if you want. –  RobSiklos Feb 13 '13 at 15:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a typical false positive on Code Analysis' part. It really cannot understand the intrinsic situation of your code, so it throws a general answer at it. Proceed with caution, but whenever you verify that you have a false positive, you can safely ignore it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'll just supress the warning. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 14:48

That is not a false positive. What if an exception is thrown after the Bar is created but before it is passed to the Foo constructor? I see several code paths where one or more objects might not be disposed of.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point. However even if GetFooX() consists of only 'Bar bar=new Bar()' followed by 'return new FooX(bar)' you get the same warning which doesnt make sense as new FooX(bar) cannot throw any exception (it only sets the state of the object inside the constructor: this.bar=bar). Still now I understand where the warning is coming from as it is possible that FooX initializer might in a general context throw an exception. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 15:11
    
Forget the above. View edits for more details. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 15:22
    
Can you show the callers of GetFooX? Do they use using? If so, then I'll agree it's a false positive, and won't blame VS since it would be pretty tough for it to determine that there are no code paths which won't dispose. –  John Saunders May 24 '11 at 16:08
    
All callers of GetFooX are in another assembly so there is no way the VS analyzer can determine possible code paths that wont Dispose. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 16:28
    
Ok, so I don't blame them at all. :-) Be sure that when you ignore the warnings, you do it in the source. I also recommend using the Justification property to document the reason for ignoring the warning in that particular case. –  John Saunders May 24 '11 at 17:12

Your disposable pattern seems a little off to me. I don't think you should be calling bar.Dispose in the FooBase class. For safety of the objects you are disposing and being able to safly call Dispose multiple time I would recoment this approach.

  private bool _disposed;
  public void Dispose()
  {
     Dispose( true );
     GC.SuppressFinalize( this );
  }

  protected virtual void Dispose( bool disposing )
  {
     if ( disposing )
     {
        if ( !_disposed )
        {
           if ( Bar != null )
           {
              Bar.Dispose();
           }

           _disposed = true;
        }
     }
  }

As for the error, I think that this should take care of the static analysis warning. I implemented your code as follows in a test project, enabled all static analysis warnings without having an issue with warnings.

public class Bar : IDisposable
{
  private bool _disposed;
  public void Dispose()
  {
     Dispose( true );
     GC.SuppressFinalize( this );
  }

  protected virtual void Dispose( bool disposing )
  {
     if ( disposing )
     {
        if ( !_disposed )
        {
           _disposed = true;
        }
     }
  }
}

public abstract class FooBase : IDisposable
{
  public Bar Bar
  {
     get;
     set;
  }

  internal FooBase( Bar bar )
  {
     Bar = bar;
  }

  private bool _disposed;
  public void Dispose()
  {
     Dispose( true );
     GC.SuppressFinalize( this );
  }

  protected virtual void Dispose( bool disposing )
  {
     if ( disposing )
     {
        if ( !_disposed )
        {
           if ( Bar != null )
           {
              Bar.Dispose();
           }

           _disposed = true;
        }
     }
  }
}

public class FooA : FooBase
{
  public FooA( Bar bar )
     : base( bar )
  {
  }
}

public static class FooProvider
{
  public static FooA GetFooA()
  {
     Bar bar;
     using ( bar = new Bar() )
     {
        return new FooA( bar );
     }
  }
}

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
  [TestMethod]
  public void StaticAnalysisTest()
  {
     Assert.IsNotNull( FooProvider.GetFooA().Bar );
  }
}

I hope this is helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, I wasn't thinking when I posted the code. Yeah the Dispose pattern was way off. I've edited it, thanks! The code is really the same as what you have written. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 15:34
    
Please note the implementation of FooA GetFooA() in the FooProvider. Once the disposable pattern is updated, that will take care of the static analysis warning. The Unit test code shows that Bar is still accessable and not nulled out after the method exits. –  Brian Dishaw May 24 '11 at 15:36
    
Yeah you're code should get rid of the warning because you are adding a public get property to bar. But that has two main issues: You are "breaking" the black box and exposing bar to consumers of FooX objets which we dont want at all. Second, we don't want FooX consumers to even know about the Bar Class at all, that is the whole point of the Provider class. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 15:40
    
About you're second comment, the using statement is not a valid option either. If I do that I'm effectively handing a FooProvider consumer a FooX object with a disposed bar. –  InBetween May 24 '11 at 15:42
    
I'm not sure that exposing Bar as a public property is what's fixing it. I only did that to show in the unit tests that it's not being destoryed until FooA is destoryed. If you change it to a prive field and have a method return it, it should function the same way. Best of luck! –  Brian Dishaw May 24 '11 at 15:45

At least part of this problem isn't really a false positive, even if it's not necessarily a very useful issue detection. To fix the remaining problem your edited version, you need to open the try block immediately after the bar assignment, not before it. e.g.:

Bar bar = new Bar();
try
{
    ///...            
    return new FooA(bar);
}
catch
{
    bar.Dispose();
    throw;
}

Unfortunately, after you make this change, you'll still get a CA2000 violation, which will probably be a false positive. That's because the rule doesn't check to see if you're placing bar into the state of the newly created FooA. If it is going into state in the FooA, you can safely create a suppression for the violation. However, if it's not going into state in FooA, you should dispose it in a finally clause instead of a catch clause.

share|improve this answer
    
bar is a state member of FooA, so yes I can supress the warning. What I'm not so sure of is if, as you state, the initialization of bar should be inside the ´try-catch´ block. If the ´Bar´ constructor throws, I dont really have a ´Bar´ object ´bar` so I can't really dispose it right? I have no idea in what state bar is, if bar represents anything at all to begin with. –  InBetween May 27 '11 at 13:36
    
If the Bar constructor throws, you will not be able to use the partially constructed instance. Your bar variable value will remain null. –  Nicole Calinoiu May 27 '11 at 15:51

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