Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Does someone know how to set the timeout for discovery. The default value is like 10-15s and it seams a bit long...

On witch side does it have to be configured? Service? Client?

Service:

            // Add a ServiceDiscoveryBehavior
            host.Description.Behaviors.Add(new ServiceDiscoveryBehavior());
            // Add a UdpDiscoveryEndpoint
            host.AddServiceEndpoint(new UdpDiscoveryEndpoint());

Client:

    EndpointAddress endPoint = null;

    endPoint = FindCalculatorServiceAddress();

    static EndpointAddress FindCalculatorServiceAddress()
    {
        // Create DiscoveryClient
        DiscoveryClient discoveryClient = new DiscoveryClient(new UdpDiscoveryEndpoint());

        // Find IStringReverser endpoints            
        FindResponse findResponse = discoveryClient.Find(new FindCriteria(typeof(IStringReverser)));

        if (findResponse.Endpoints.Count > 0)
        {
            return findResponse.Endpoints[0].Address;
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
By the way, if you use the FindAsync() method with the FindProgressChanged and FindCompleted events rather than the synchronous Find() method, the FindProgressChanged event is fired as soon as the endpoint results come in, meaning you'll have access to them immediately instead of having to wait to the end of the search. You can choose to do CancelAsync() if you're not interested in more results, or just let it run until it times out, at which point FindCompleted fires. –  Alex Feb 6 at 6:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe you need to set the Duration property of FindCriteria

FindCriteria.Duration Property

share|improve this answer
    
Works great! Thanks ! –  John May 24 '11 at 16:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.