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Greetings,

I have two data frames:

df1
x1  x2
1   a
2   b
3   c
4   d

and

df2
x1  x2
2   zz
3   qq

I want to replace some of the values in df1$x2 with values in df2$x2 based on the conditional match between df1$x1 and df2$x2 to produce:

df1
x1  x2
1   a
2   zz
3   qq
4   d
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3 Answers 3

use match(), assuming values in df1 are unique.

df1 <- data.frame(x1=1:4,x2=letters[1:4],stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
df2 <- data.frame(x1=2:3,x2=c("zz","qq"),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

df1$x2[match(df2$x1,df1$x1)] <- df2$x2
> df1
  x1 x2
1  1  a
2  2 zz
3  3 qq
4  4  d

If the values aren't unique, use :

for(id in 1:nrow(df2)){
  df1$x2[df1$x1 %in% df2$x1[id]] <- df2$x2[id]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I wrote the match with reversed arguments and couldn't figure out why it was more complicated than I thought it should be. I'll add my answer as well because it may help others to think about how the changing the order of arguments in match can make things easier or harder. –  Aaron May 24 '11 at 14:56
    
Thanks Joris. I was working with 'match' but couldn't get it to work. –  Mike May 24 '11 at 15:13

I see that Joris and Aaron have both chosen to build examples without factors. I can certainly understand that choice. For the reader with columns that are already factors there would also be to option of coercion to "character". There is a strategy that avoids that constraint and which also allows for the possibility that there may be indices in df2 that are not in df1 which I believe would invalidate Joris Meys but not Aarons solutions posted so far:

df1 <- data.frame(x1=1:4,x2=letters[1:4])
df2 <- data.frame(x1=c(2,3,5), x2=c("zz", "qq", "xx") )

It requires that the levels be expanded to include the intersection of both factor variables and then also the need to drop non-matching columns (= NA values) in match(df1$x1, df2$x1)

 df1$x2 <- factor(df1$x2 , levels=c(levels(df1$x2), levels(df2$x2)) )
 df1$x2[na.omit(match(df2$x1,df1$x1))] <- df2$x2[which(df2$x1 %in% df1$x1)]
 df1
#-----------
  x1 x2
1  1  a
2  2 zz
3  3 qq
4  4  d
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1  
Nice. Factors can be tricky and the advice to expand the levels is helpful. You do end up with an unneeded level in df1$x2 though (the xx). –  Aaron May 24 '11 at 16:26
    
If you want to remove what are now superfluous levels, then do this: df1$x2 <- factor(df1$x2) –  BondedDust May 24 '11 at 16:55

You can do it by matching the other way too but it's more complicated. Joris's solution is better but I'm putting this here also as a reminder to think about which way you want to match.

df1 <- data.frame(x1=1:4, x2=letters[1:4], stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
df2 <- data.frame(x1=2:3, x2=c("zz", "qq"), stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
swap <- df2$x2[match(df1$x1, df2$x1)]
ok <- !is.na(swap)
df1$x2[ok] <- swap[ok]

> df1
  x1 x2
1  1  a
2  2 zz
3  3 qq
4  4  d
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